2012 looks like better year to host Super Bowl than 2011

July 19, 2011
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

If the NFL labor battle gets worked out later this week or early next week as many league insider think, chalk one up for the little guy.

And by that I mean Indianapolis and this city’s leadership. And you could throw in Colts owner Jim Irsay, though I’m sure he won’t like being called little in reference to other NFL owners.

Instead, let’s say chalk one up for the good guys, the home team or however you want to couch it.

Let me explain.

In 2007, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, one of the biggest of the big boys among NFL owners, threw his weight around and out-muscled Indianapolis for the 2011 Super Bowl.

Lucas Oil Stadium was finished before the Jerry Dome down in Dallas, so the vote by the NFL owners didn’t really make sense. After all, the NFL commissioner all but promised that if we built a new stadium, the Super Bowl would come. But there was this: Jones didn’t want the 2012 Super Bowl because he thought it might be sullied by the labor rift the league has been struggling with since March.

So after finishing runner-up for the 2011 Super Bowl, Indianapolis and Colts officials did what was logical. In 2008, at the NFL owners meeting in Atlanta, they bid for the 2012 Super Bowl—and won.

At the same meeting, the NFL owners opted out of the collective bargaining agreement with players, and union leaders went absolutely ballistic. There was talk of owners trying to break the union. It had all the makings of a long labor fight.

Jones was surely pleased with his calculated manuever.

But for those who went to the 2011 Super Bowl in Dallas, especially the media, nothing was more talked about than the soon-to-be expiring labor deal.

It truly was a distraction from the big game and the city hosting it. But with all the problems Dallas had—ice storms, slabs of snow cascading off the stadium onto people, malfunctioning stadium entrances and stands that couldn’t pass government inspection—maybe it was a good thing for Dallas that there was something to distract the throngs in the Lone Star state for the game.

It now turns out that by the time the 2012 Super Bowl rolls around, this labor fight will in all likelihood long be forgotten. The sole focus will be on the city and all its amenities.

And if needed, its ice melting salt and shiny, efficient snow plows.
 

ADVERTISEMENT
  • And they all lived happily ever after
    They haven't signed yet...but if and when they do, that will be sweet for Indy, and retro justice for the biggest ego in football, Jerry Jones. Sometimes the worst thing that can happen to you is to get what you want, and perhaps the 2011 Super Bowl, and all the problems that went with it, will turn out to be just that for Mr. Jones.
  • HALF TIME SHOW
    YOU GUYS NEED TOO HAVE Rihanna at the half time show she will make it a amazing evening
  • Welcome halftime show
    Rihanna? yeah right. Why have a performer that is current? The Super Bowl will have the Moody Blues, or Belinda Carlisle, or Tiffany. Why make it suck more than it has for years?
  • Rihanna?
    Oh, sure, that's all the Super Bowl needs to do is headline that piece of trash......
    • RE: Berwick Guy
      I have a great idea. BerwickGuy could perform at Halftime. Judging by all of his comments over the years, I'm sure he's a professional at everything he does.
    • RE: Berwick Guy
      I have a great idea. BerwickGuy could perform at Halftime. Judging by all of his comments over the years, I'm sure he's a professional at everything he does.
    • halftime
      Thanks, John, you just confirmed the unprofessionalism of the suggested half-time performer, Rihanna.

      Appreciate it!
    • Berwick
      Wow Berwick. I've seen you call out people several times on this blog for name calling. And then you go and call Rihanna a "piece of trash". Here's your Hypocrite sign.
      • DEI
        Yes, Dutch, you're right and you've correctly called me out before. I stand corrected with an apology. I had no right to be that judgemental. I should have made reference to "a popular entertainer that, in my opinion, sometimes behaves badly in a trashy way".

        That would have been accurate.

      Post a comment to this blog

      COMMENTS POLICY
      We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
       
      You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
       
      Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
       
      No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
       
      We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
       

      Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

      Sponsored by
      ADVERTISEMENT
      1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

      2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

      3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

      4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

      5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

      ADVERTISEMENT