You-review-it Monday

January 4, 2009
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Two shows opening at Theatre on the Square. The first First Friday of 2009. A couple of stray concerts. And, of course, all that New Years activity.

There was a surprising number of choices of arts activity over the last few days. I caught the exhibition at the Harrison Center, Indianapolis Civic's sing-along "Wizard of Oz," and "Edges: A Song Cycle" from the new Programs company. (Look for reviews in an upcoming IBJ.)

So what did you get to see over the long weekend?
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  • Well Lou, you forgot to mention you got to win a trivia prize at the Wizard of Oz Thursday! I'm not sure you didn't have an unfair advantage, but it's cool you get a chance to win something once in awhile.
    The interactive sing a long at the Wizard of Oz was a lot of fun--they should do shows like that more often. One negative was that the little ones seated near me were very disappointed when they didn't get to do the 'parade' that was promised at the beginning.
    The show itself was only ordinary--not the usual excellent Civic quality, but the audience activity may have distracted the actors a bit. Not everyday you have bubbles floating and audience members shouting out dialogue!
  • I didn't see any theater but I did see the movie Milk. I'm not a Sean Penn fan, but he was truly mesmerizing in the role of Harvey Milk. He really became the character. I forgot it was even Sean Penn he made me believe so completely! A very well done movie and a history lesson to those of us who were born in the 70's and missed this stuff when it happened. It's astounding to me that 30 years later some of the rhetoric is still the same. Anita's speeches don't sound that much different from what you hear today. I left thinking how from we've come and yet we haven't come nearly far enough. Definately an Oscar worthy performance from Sean Penn.
  • After reading the IBJ this weekend, I surmise that we just missed each other at the IMA. With not much on my calendar last week, I decided to pay a visit to check out the Vogel donation. Art is definitely in the eye of the beholder - I'm not sure I would accept a few watercolor brush strokes on notebook paper as great art.

    Of course, I had forgotten about the Hopper exhibit you wrote about a few months ago so I was pleasantly surprised by it. I enjoyed the presentation of Hopper's working sketches as they lead up to his painting of the Hotel Lobby. I'm not an art student but I found it educational to go back and forth between them to see how they ended up in the finished work.

    I liked the concept behind the lobby rope sculptures but also found them to be unwelcoming. Maybe it was because they were so large and obstructed views of the lobby. Of course they are asking to be touched while the signage says otherwise.
  • First Friday - Harrison Center had a decent crowd listening to music in one studio; Emma
    Overman's art was taking the 'other-worldly' story-land approach; William Rasdell's
    photographic images on metal sheets stops the viewer to delve into the sole/soul essence
    of the subject; Matt Kenyon's new Glass studio peeks around the stage corner holding a serious variety of art glass;Toni Hook gives new meaning to 'painted fence', vibrant-deep-painful at times.

    Mark Ruschman's featured ceramic artist Malcolm Mobutu Smith was showing two distinct abstract series; Cloud Cups & Tripods.

    Art Bank keeps growing a new nook with each additional artist. Big Car had a plethora
    of yellow post-it notes responding to basic questions (i.e.What did you really want for Christmas, but didn't get?). Interactive at best, maybe if the questions were harder??

    Art Box was the perfect end to the evening of gallery hopping. Myers Designs displayed massive wooden art/furniture pieces, while Phil O'Malley expressed his appreciation and frustration through timeless, yet, in-the moment paintings waiting to be thoroughly consumed. Good times ; )

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  1. Why not take some time to do some research before traveling to that Indiana town or city, and find the ones that are no smoking either inside, or have a patio? People like yourself are just being selfish, and unnecessarily trying to take away all indoor venues that smokers can enjoy themselves at. Last time I checked, it is still a free country, and businesses do respond to market pressure and will ban smoking, if there's enough demand by customers for it(i.e. Linebacker Lounge in South Bend, and Rack and Helen's in New Haven, IN, outside of Fort Wayne). Indiana law already unnecessarily forced restaurants with a bar area to be no smoking, so why not support those restaurants that were forced to ban smoking against their will? Also, I'm always surprised at the number of bars that chose to ban smoking on their own, in non-ban parts of Indiana I'll sometimes travel into. Whiting, IN(just southeast of Chicago) has at least a few bars that went no smoking on their own accord, and despite no selfish government ban forcing those bars to make that move against their will! I'd much rather have a balance of both smoking and non-smoking bars, rather than a complete bar smoking ban that'll only force more bars to close their doors. And besides IMO, there are much worser things to worry about, than cigarette smoke inside a bar. If you feel a bar is too smoky, then simply walk out and take your business to a different bar!

  2. As other states are realizing the harm in jailing offenders of marijuana...Indiana steps backwards into the script of Reefer Madness. Well...you guys voted for your Gov...up to you to vote him out. Signed, Citizen of Florida...the next state to have medical marijuana.

  3. It's empowering for this niche community to know that they have an advocate on their side in case things go awry. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lrst9VXVKfE

  4. Apparently the settlement over Angie's List "bundling" charges hasn't stopped the practice! My membership is up for renewal, and I'm on my third email trying to get a "basic" membership rather than the "bundled" version they're trying to charge me for. Frustrating!!

  5. Well....as a vendor to both of these builders I guess I have the right to comment. Davis closed his doors with integrity.He paid me every penny he owed me. Estridge,STILL owes me thousands and thousands of dollars. The last few years of my life have been spent working 2 jobs, paying off the suppliers I used to work on Estridge jobs and just struggling to survive. Shame on you Paul...and shame on you IBJ! Maybe you should have contacted the hundreds of vendors that Paul stiffed. I'm sure your "rises from the ashes" spin on reporting would have contained true stories of real people who have struggled to find work and pay of their debts (something that Paul didn't even attempt to do).

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