IBJNews

Butler still getting big bounce from 2010 NCAA run

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

As Butler University men’s basketball team prepared for its fifth consecutive NCAA tournament appearance on Thursday, school officials were still measuring the positive consequences of the Bulldogs’ run to the championship game at Lucas Oil Stadium last April.

Butler dropped the title 2010 game to Duke University, but won legions of fans and an avalanche of favorable publicity.

The most memorable moment for basketball fans may be Gordon Hayward’s end-of-game shot that could have given Butler the win, but school officials said  applicants to the university remember something else.

Butler admission staff members said they heard repeatedly from potential students and their parents during high school visits last fall that their main memory of the Bulldogs’ run was that the school’s basketball players went to class the day of the NCAA championship game.

On Thursday, Butler was scheduled to play Old Dominion University in Washington, D.C. Tip time was set for 12:40 p.m. The Bulldogs, a No. 8 seed, will have a difficult time repeating last year’s tournament success, on or off the court.

In the wake of the 2010 run, men’s basketball season ticket sales increased more than 25 percent over the previous year. Average attendance at each home game during the 2010-11 season was 7,177, the highest in more than 40 years.

The number of applications to Butler has gone up 41 percent—to a total of 9,357—compared with the same time last year, according to school officials. Requests for information and campus visits by prospective students are both up 35 percent for the year.

“That’s a solid indicator of interest,” said Tom Weede, Butler’s vice president for enrollment management.

Applications from outside Indiana have increased 62 percent over last year’s figures. In-state applications rose 18 percent, Weede added.

Though Butler officials declined to discuss specifics about their financials, they said donations to Butler’s athletic programs are up significantly, and the number of undergraduate alumni giving to the school increased 10 percent over a year ago.

In October, two major Homecoming functions—the President’s Dinner and Bulldog Beauty Contest, set attendance records. Overall, alumni events are seeing more new participants.

Weede is not surprised that last spring’s tournament exposure generated more interest among college applicants.

“People knew where Butler was because they saw us in the Final Four,” he said. “No one applies to schools they’ve never heard of.”

That larger applicant pool means more competition to be one of the students Butler will accept to fill 960 freshmen seats in fall 2011, Weede said, adding that the university has extended about 200 more enrollment offers than last year, an increase of 3 percent.

Sports-business experts said the financial bounce of Butler’s success is likely a mid-seven-figure number. But the win didn’t come cheap, either.

A week after the championship game, Butler signed its men’s basketball coach, Brad Stevens, to a lucrative 12-year contract extension that experts valued at $1 million annually—nearly three times what Stevens made during the 2009-10 season.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

ADVERTISEMENT