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Indianapolis Business Journal Privacy Statement:

Indianapolis Business Journal will never share your private information (e-mail address, etc.) with anyone unless you expressly request IBJ to do so.

IBJ Corp. has created this privacy statement in order to demonstrate our firm commitment to privacy. We will never sell or transfer any information we collect from you unless you specifically request that we do so. We do not sell, rent, or give your information to any other company.

The following discloses our information gathering and dissemination practices for this website: www.ibj.com.

We use your IP address to help diagnose problems with our server, and to administer our Web site. Registration forms on ibj.com may require users to give contact information (such as their name and email address) and demographic information (such as their zip code, age, or phone number). We use customer contact information from the registration forms to send the user information about our company and promotional material about some of our partners.

Demographic and profile data is also collected at our site. We use this data to tailor our communication with our visitors. We do not share this information with anyone.

This site may contain links to other sites. ibj.com is not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of such Web sites.

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  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

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