IBJNews

2013 Healthiest Employers: Draper Inc.

Tom Harton
August 16, 2013
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

winner OR finalist 500-1,499 EMPLOYEES

Draper Inc. brings wellness on­­-site with amenities, fitness challenges

draper-wellness-committee-15col.jpg One of Draper’s fitness challenges ended with a bike giveaway. (Photo provided)

Draper Inc. is on the edge of Spiceland, a small town about 40 miles east of Indianapolis. Which is a nice way of saying that the company is located between two cornfields. That means Draper has to bring fitness to its employees.

Almost everything Draper does in the name of employee wellness happens on-site, said Linda Brinson, safety and wellness director for the company, which makes window shades, gymnasium equipment, projection screens and lifts.

When the 111-year-old company started it’s wellness program seven years ago it immediately installed an on-site clinic and partnered with Henry County Memorial Hospital to staff the clinic with a physician, a nurse practitioner and nurses. It’s full service, five days a week, and for a $10 copay is open to employees’ families, which means this time of year the clinic is busy doing school physicals for the children of Draper employees.

logo-draper-168.gifThe company made smoking cessation one of its first goals, and brings the program to its employees. Classes are held on site and medications are provided free of charge.

Dawn Jones is one of the employees who has contributed to a 41 percent decline in tobacco use since the wellness program started.

Jones and her boyfriend quit a week apart in the first half of January 2010. She had to stay away from some of her oldest friends because they still smoked and she was afraid she wouldn’t be able to resist the temptation. So Jones started spending more time with others in the smoking cessation class. “I had to stay away from the smell completely,” she said. “Now it repulses me.”

screening Health screenings are a basic component of Draper’s program. (Photo provided)

Jones quit, as it turns out, by replacing one habit with another. Instead of smoking, she walks about five miles a day. She did it initially to ward off weight gain, but now it’s part of her daily routine.

She was one of Draper’s first Wellness Superheroes. Featured in the company’s monthly wellness newsletter, superheroes are nominated by their peers and then held up as an example of the difference the wellness program can make.

For Jones, who now serves on Draper’s employee wellness committee, the difference has been financial as well as physical. The $5 a pack she used to spend on smokes has paid for a new mattress, box spring and television. The rest goes into her Health Savings Account.

Draper uses paid time off and other incentives to get employees to participate, but for Jones and many others some of the activities are just plain fun.

Among the most popular activities is Draper’s “Walk to Hawaii” challenge. Well over half of the company’s 516 employees participated in the quest to walk the 2.4 million steps it would take to get to Hawaii by foot (if one could walk on water). Everyone who completed the challenge was entered in a drawing for a trip for two to Hawaii. A map of the route to the island paradise showed employees where they were on their journey.

garden This is the second season for the company’s on-site garden. (Photo provided)

Draper’s wellness program has progressed to the point that it recently added an on-site health coach to the mix. The coach meets with employees about their annual health risk assessment results then helps establish individual health goals and prods them to achieve them. Those who succeed get an additional day of paid vacation.

The coach also helps employees take advantage of an outdoor fitness park, added in 2008, and walking track. While there is no indoor gym at Draper, the company does offer free membership at a nearby gym and reduced price memberships at other gyms in the area.

While Draper employees benefit from healthier bodies, the company itself has seen health claims reduced by 12 percent.

Among the impressive health gains turned in by Draper’s workforce are a collective weight loss of 3,000 pounds, a 33 percent reduction in high blood pressure and a 28 percent reduction in the incidence of high cholesterol. Financial classes have reduced collective employee debt by more than $26,000 and resulted in additional savings of more than $10,000.

“We knew when we started the program we were on the cutting edge of something,” Brinson said. Company management wasn’t certain where the program would take them, but they’re happy with the result.•

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. With Pence running the ship good luck with a new government building on the site. He does everything on the cheap except unnecessary roads line a new beltway( like we need that). Things like state of the art office buildings and light rail will never be seen as an asset to these types. They don't get that these are the things that help a city prosper.

  2. Does the $100,000,000,000 include salaries for members of Congress?

  3. "But that doesn't change how the piece plays to most of the people who will see it." If it stands out so little during the day as you seem to suggest maybe most of the people who actually see it will be those present when it is dark enough to experience its full effects.

  4. That's the mentality of most retail marketers. In this case Leo was asked to build the brand. HHG then had a bad sales quarter and rather than stay the course, now want to go back to the schlock that Zimmerman provides (at a considerable cut in price.) And while HHG salesmen are, by far, the pushiest salesmen I have ever experienced, I believe they are NOT paid on commission. But that doesn't mean they aren't trained to be aggressive.

  5. The reason HHG's sales team hits you from the moment you walk through the door is the same reason car salesmen do the same thing: Commission. HHG's folks are paid by commission they and need to hit sales targets or get cut, while BB does not. The sales figures are aggressive, so turnover rate is high. Electronics are the largest commission earners along with non-needed warranties, service plans etc, known in the industry as 'cheese'. The wholesale base price is listed on the cryptic price tag in the string of numbers near the bar code. Know how to decipher it and you get things at cost, with little to no commission to the sales persons. Whether or not this is fair, is more of a moral question than a financial one.

ADVERTISEMENT