IBJNews

2011 CFO OF THE YEAR: Jim Zaloudek

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Honoree, Private Companies (Revenue $100 million or less)

T2 Systems Inc. aims to be a $50 million company by 2015. A move by CFO Jim Zaloudek this year might just take it there.

Zaloudek (IBJ Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

He succeeded in scoring a $28 million equity investment from North Carolina-based Pamlico Capital.

“Pamlico sets the company up for another 10 years of growth,” Zaloudek said. “It gives us access to capital we’ve never had in our history.”

Indianapolis-based T2 Systems, founded in 1994, now has $20 million in annual revenue and 110 employees. The company provides parking management services, including permits, citations, collections, event parking and parking in gated facilities. It has 300 customers in the United States and Canada, including universities, cities, airports and hospitals.

Zaloudek bioLanding the Pamlico investment was a 14-month process, he said. With the fresh capital in place, T2 plans to add 15 people a year and go on a buying spree. The company is now looking at two or three candidates.

When Zaloudek joined T2 in 2005, his goal was to raise capital for growth. He succeeded in attracting an initial round of $3 million from Petra Capital in Nashville, Tenn., in 2007.

T2, which has grown by 25 percent or more in recent years, has repeatedly been named to the Inc. 5,000 list of fastest-growing companies.

Zaloudek has put in place metrics that have enabled the company to better measure the impact of its efforts on revenue, said Michael Simmons, T2 chairman and CEO, who nominated Zaloudek for CFO of the Year. Those metrics in turn have helped the company refine its pricing and develop more reliable budgets. One of Zaloudek’s earliest moves at the company was helping it evolve from selling licenses for its products to selling subscriptions, which evened out cash flow.

“I’m most proud of my ability to plan to handle difficult times as well as leverage good times to the best advantage of the staff and customers,” Zaloudek said. “As long as you keep those two groups happy, usually cash flow and the rest of the business does well.”

One way he tries to keep those groups satisfied is by not taking himself too seriously, he said. He has been known to juggle at company meetings. He even finds a way to joke about EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization). “If we have “eh-buh-duh,” then we can make payroll,” he regularly announces to the staff. He sometimes leads them in chants of “eh-buh-duh!” to help them get a handle on what they can do to help the company’s bottom line.

“There’s pressure, but you can use humor to diffuse some of that and make numbers more approachable,” Zaloudek said.

Humor also can help minimize the ivory tower image that a finance department sometimes projects, said Zaloudek, who has tried to fashion his team after Nordstrom department store’s example of outstanding customer service.

Zaloudek previously was CFO of eGix Inc., an Indianapolis-based telecommunications company. Before that he spent 12 years in public accounting, which he calls an excellent way to start a career in finance. It exposes budding accountants to a variety of executives and companies. His advice:

“Pick the one that you enjoy working in each day and see if you can leverage that into an individual job you like,” Zaloudek said. “You have to be able to enjoy your work each day. If not, you’re going to have a tough 40 years.”•

_____

Click here to return to the CFO of the Year landing page.

 

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. The Walgreens did not get a lot of traffic. It was not located on the corner of the intersection, and not really visible from Emerson. Meanwhile the CVS there is huge and right on the corner. I am guessing a lot of people drove by a million times and never knew the Walgreens was there. Although, with the new Walmart market going in, that area could really see a lot of increase in traffic soon.

  2. You folks don't have a clue. There is a legal way to enter this country and to get aid. This left unchecked could run us to ruin quickly. I also heard that 'supporters' were getting major $$ to take them in? Who's monitoring this and guess who pays the bill? I support charitable organizations... but this is NOT the way to do it!

  3. Apparently at some time before alcohol has been served at the fair. The problem is that beer or wine used to be a common drink for people before soft drinks and was not thought to be that unusual. Since many folks now only drink to see how much they can drink or what kind of condition they can end up in it becomes more problematic. Go to Europe and its no big deal just as if you had sodas of milk to drink everyday. Its using common sense that is lacking now days.

  4. To address the epic failure of attracting race fans to both the Indy 500 and Brickyard 400 would take too much of my time to write. Bottom line Boles is clueless and obviously totally out of touch with the real paying fan base. I see nothing but death spin coming for the Brickyard, just like Indy. Get somebody in a place of power that understands what race fans want.

  5. I am a race fan through & through. It doesn't matter if it's Indy cars or Nascar. I love a great race. I go to several other tracks each year and you can see the entire track. I know Indy has tradition, but fans want to see the entire race. I sit in the Penthouse, am almost 60 years old, and would like to see a better TV screen in turn 1 so you can see the entire race. Then I think Indy needs to install an escalator so us old folks can make it up to the Penthouse and down again if we want more options to purchase food and drinks. Just a race fans opinion. Lights won't make the race any better, but you might be able to see the TV better at night. Turn 1's screen needs replaced with a better and bigger screen.

ADVERTISEMENT