IBJNews

2012 Forty Under 40: Derek Empie

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Derek Empie
Where were you, and what were you doing in 1991?
Graduating from high school in Atlanta and attending DePauw University as a freshman.

When you graduated from high school, what did you think you wanted to be as an adult?
To work in sports broadcasting.

Was there an event in the last 20 years that had a great impact on your aspirations and/or career path?
I met my wife Amber at DePauw and that day has had the most profound impact on my aspirations and career path. She encouraged me to go to law school, and helped pay for school, when I saw the value of a law degree while working with executives at Turner Broadcasting System who went to law school.

Have you been mentored by (or had any significant interactions with) previous Forty Under 40 honorees?
I have had the privilege of working with about a dozen honorees and have learned something from each of them. The common traits among all of them are their intelligence, hard work ethic and treatment of others. One individual, David Barrett, an attorney with Faegre Baker Daniels, played a special role in my development as an attorney after I moved to Indiana from Georgia in 2005.

Where/what do you want to be 20 years from now?
To be at IU Health as a key contributor in its legal department but recognizing from my past experiences that the future can be full of surprises.
 

Associate General Counsel, Indiana University Health Inc.
Age: 39

Sometimes your “dream job” isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. That’s what Derek Empie, former broadcast sports professional-turned-attorney, discovered after several years working for NBC Sports, ESPN and Turner Broadcasting.

“You work a lot of hours, travel all over the place,” said Empie, adding, “The pay is really low.”

While working on advertising and marketing campaigns for Atlanta’s pro sports teams at Turner, he noticed that many of the company’s top executives had law degrees. “It was an asset, no matter what you wanted to do.”

So with the support of his wife, Amber, he enrolled in law school at Georgia State University. A Georgia native, he did his undergraduate work at DePauw University in Greencastle.

As associate general counsel at Indiana University Health the past two years, he provides a variety of legal services concerning contracts, acquisitions, and labor and employment issues. After his first year at IU Health, he received the company’s 2010 Key Contributor Award, which recognizes outstanding achievement and service. He and other attorneys on staff take turns being on call 24/7 for a month at a time.

“During those times you really get the unique legal questions,” said Empie. “You gain a perspective of what physicians really do.” While he may get a 3 a.m. call once a month, “that’s their life.”

Prior to joining IU Health, Empie worked for nearly five years at Baker & Daniels LLP, where he handled a similar variety of legal matters.

Empie’s volunteer commitments include being a member of the NFL Fitness & Football Subcommittee, which is involved in youth football and fitness activities and operated a run/walk event here during Super Bowl week. He is also on the board of Carmel Dad’s Club, which oversees youth sports programs and is on the WFYI Community Relations Advisory Committee.

He and his wife have an 8-year-old son and 6-year-old twin daughters.•
 

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

ADVERTISEMENT