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2012 Forty Under 40: Michele Meyer

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Michele Meyer
Where were you, and what were you doing in 1991?
Graduating from high school and starting college.

When you graduated from high school, what did you think you wanted to be as an adult?
I initially wanted to go to law school but ran short on money so decided to start working after I got my bachelor’s degree.

Was there an event in the last 20 years that had a great impact on your aspirations and/or career path?
Within my first 18 months of working for a large corporation, I was fortunate enough to receive a management opportunity. The experience of impacting an organization, and, more importantly, coaching and mentoring a team, was motivating. I am fortunate that I had great mentors and was given an opportunity to manage a team that was open to my 24-year-old passion.

Where/what do you want to be 20 years from now?
To own a company that runs itself and, on the personal side, get my law degree.
 

Owner, CSCI Consulting Inc.
Age: 38

Some people build a business from the ground up. In 2002, Michele Meyer started her information technology company, CSCI Consulting, in the basement of her Fishers home. Today, CSCI employs about 100 people, who provide custom software for federal and state agencies.

The “office” has moved to East 56th Street near CSCI’s biggest client, the U.S. Defense Finance and Accounting Service.

“I always had the intent of owning a company,” said Meyer. “I saw the opportunity and went for it.”

CSCI is recognized for its robust growth. It was No. 1 on IBJ’s list of fastest-growing local private companies in 2010, with revenue of $12.43 million.

“We definitely want to get bigger,” said Meyer, noting that CSCI opened an office in Ohio in December and placed its first people in Washington, D.C., earlier last year.

A military brat who grew up in Berlin, Germany, Meyer and her family moved to Georgia when she was ready for high school. She stayed for college, majoring in history and political science at Georgia Southern University.

Meyer and her husband, Roger, who also is part of the CSCI corporate team, have five girls and one boy, ages 10 to 21.

“We got really lucky because my youngest was born when my husband’s oldest was 8; they’ve always been really close,” she said.

Although she says she’s not a morning person, she works out at 5:30 a.m. at Indy Adventure Boot Camp.

She is active in the Indianapolis and Fishers chambers of commerce, and the United Way of Central Indiana.

“Part of what I love about the United Way is that it gives great team-building opportunities” for companies, she said. She is a new member of the United Way Tocqueville Society.

She also volunteers with Girls Inc., and provides sponsorship for Lawrence Young Life, a multicultural program. She also participated in a plane-pull fundraiser for Special Olympics.•

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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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