IBJNews

2012 CFO OF THE YEAR: Jack A. Gochenaur

Sam Stall
November 27, 2012
Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Honoree, Not-For-Profit

The career of Manchester University vice president, CFO and treasurer Jack A. Gochenaur has followed a distinctly circular path. He graduated from Manchester in 1970, worked numerous positions around the Midwest, then returned to his alma mater in 2003 as vice president of financial affairs and treasurer. There he oversees a $34 million annual budget that includes investments, recordkeeping, student financial aid, information technology—even the campus food service.

During his nine years on the job he’s helped increase enrollment, strengthened the school’s finances and overseen both a $9.1 million renovation and expansion of the Academic Center on the school’s main campus, and creation of a Fort Wayne satellite campus with a $19 million main building that houses Manchester’s pharmacy school.

jack-gochenaur02-1col.jpg (IBJ Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

Age: 64

Family: wife Dianna; daughters Heather, 41, Heidi, 38; son Hans, 35

Hometown: Columbia City, Ind.

Education: degrees in accounting and business education, Manchester College; CPA

Civic Involvement: Various church related groups

Hobbies: Family time, home projects

“Jack provided the financial projection data and a compelling argument to help convince a risk-averse board of trustees that the College of Pharmacy was financially viable,” said Manchester University President Jo Young Switzer.

All of this was accomplished in the teeth of the great recession. “The university’s ability to be true to its mission and live within its means during this difficult period was in no small part due to the respect and trust that Jack has with other members of the leadership team,” says university trustee Chuck Winger.

As for revenue, Gochenaur has focused administrative and board attention on gaining dollars from all aspects of enrollment, from room and board to tuition, and facilitated enrollment growth from 1,050 to 1,300 students. Gochenaur was also the driving force behind the creation of the Indiana Risk Management Association, an insurance consortium of nine private colleges that self-insure casualty and liability coverage.

He’s also made a difference simply by hanging around for so long. “Before Jack’s arrival, Manchester had four CFOs in 10 years,” said former trustee Ken Metzger. “Jack brought much-needed stability to the institution’s finances.”

Gochenaur, who refinanced the school’s debt into a new tax-exempt bond to take advantage of today’s low rates, is also a strong advocate of student financial literacy, and counsels individual students facing financial and personal challenges.

“Colleges are receiving a lot of challenging press lately around the topics of affordability, accessibility, high levels of student debt, student loan default rates, graduation rates in four or five years that are too low, and competition from non-traditional providers,” he says. “It requires bold leadership from faculty and staff to explore our delivery methods in light of the demands of the marketplace, to make changes where required but not to sacrifice our mission.”

This year Gochenaur thinks students will continue to struggle to find the cash necessary to pay for a four-year degree. As for the rest of the country, he sees a significant amount of pessimism among the citizenry.

“It can be contagious and self-fulfilling,” he says. “I believe that next year will be much the same as 2012. There are no clear ‘fixes’ in sight. We are in a world economy and heavily influenced by world economies and events. Learning to deal with a world of uncertainty without becoming paralyzed will afford us the possibilities of being leaders in our own organizations.”•

___

Click here to return to the CFO of the Year landing page.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. The $104K to CRC would go toward debts service on $486M of existing debt they already have from other things outside this project. Keystone buys the bonds for 3.8M from CRC, and CRC in turn pays for the parking and site work, and some time later CRC buys them back (with interest) from the projected annual property tax revenue from the entire TIF district (est. $415K / yr. from just this property, plus more from all the other property in the TIF district), which in theory would be about a 10-year term, give-or-take. CRC is basically betting on the future, that property values will increase, driving up the tax revenue to the limit of the annual increase cap on commercial property (I think that's 3%). It should be noted that Keystone can't print money (unlike the Federal Treasury) so commercial property tax can only come from consumers, in this case the apartment renters and consumers of the goods and services offered by the ground floor retailers, and employees in the form of lower non-mandatory compensation items, such as bonuses, benefits, 401K match, etc.

  2. $3B would hurt Lilly's bottom line if there were no insurance or Indemnity Agreement, but there is no way that large an award will be upheld on appeal. What's surprising is that the trial judge refused to reduce it. She must have thought there was evidence of a flagrant, unconscionable coverup and wanted to send a message.

  3. As a self-employed individual, I always saw outrageous price increases every year in a health insurance plan with preexisting condition costs -- something most employed groups never had to worry about. With spouse, I saw ALL Indiana "free market answer" plans' premiums raise 25%-45% each year.

  4. It's not who you chose to build it's how they build it. Architects and engineers decide how and what to use to build. builders just do the work. Architects & engineers still think the tarp over the escalators out at airport will hold for third time when it snows, ice storms.

  5. http://www.abcactionnews.com/news/duke-energy-customers-angry-about-money-for-nothing

ADVERTISEMENT