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July 2, 2012
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Covance Inc. is seeking state and local tax incentives as part of a $150 million expansion that would create 465 jobs at its Greenfield operations, nearly doubling the number of employees there. The proposed expansion would occur over the next four years and include the construction of a new laboratory, the renovation of existing buildings, and the hiring of administrative and laboratory personnel, according to the Daily Reporter in Greenfield. Princeton, N.J.-based Covance, a pharmaceutical research company, acquired Greenfield Labs from Eli Lilly and Co. in October 2008 for $50 million and a 10-year agreement from Lilly to use Covance’s services. At that time, 264 Lilly employees shifted to Covance. The company now employs 565 workers at the site, according to the newspaper. The Hancock County Council is set to hear Covance’s request for incentives July 11. Documents filed with the county show the 465 jobs would add $29 million in salaries with annual pay averaging more than $62,000 per employee, the Daily Reporter said. The company uses the Greenfield Laboratories to conduct early-stage tests of experimental drug molecules, readying them for tests in humans.

Officials from Indiana University Health Arnett broke ground on a facility in West Lafayette last week, according to the Journal and Courier of Lafayette. The new location, housed in a former Kmart store, will add outpatient imaging and expanded laboratory services to IU Health’s existing services in West Lafayette. The $8 million facility also will include an urgent care center with extended hours of operation. Indianapolis-based IU Health operates a full-scale hospital in Lafayette.

Dr. Yang Sun, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Glick Eye Institute, received a five-year, $1 million grant from the National Eye Institute to study congenital glaucoma with the hope of discovering new treatments for common forms of glaucoma. “Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world, yet the mechanisms of glaucoma development remain poorly understood, and treatments are limited,” Sun said. “I’m hoping to understand the mechanism of inherited congenital glaucoma, in the hopes that this will provide insight and potentially lead to novel treatments for commonly seen forms of glaucoma.”

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  1. With Pence running the ship good luck with a new government building on the site. He does everything on the cheap except unnecessary roads line a new beltway( like we need that). Things like state of the art office buildings and light rail will never be seen as an asset to these types. They don't get that these are the things that help a city prosper.

  2. Does the $100,000,000,000 include salaries for members of Congress?

  3. "But that doesn't change how the piece plays to most of the people who will see it." If it stands out so little during the day as you seem to suggest maybe most of the people who actually see it will be those present when it is dark enough to experience its full effects.

  4. That's the mentality of most retail marketers. In this case Leo was asked to build the brand. HHG then had a bad sales quarter and rather than stay the course, now want to go back to the schlock that Zimmerman provides (at a considerable cut in price.) And while HHG salesmen are, by far, the pushiest salesmen I have ever experienced, I believe they are NOT paid on commission. But that doesn't mean they aren't trained to be aggressive.

  5. The reason HHG's sales team hits you from the moment you walk through the door is the same reason car salesmen do the same thing: Commission. HHG's folks are paid by commission they and need to hit sales targets or get cut, while BB does not. The sales figures are aggressive, so turnover rate is high. Electronics are the largest commission earners along with non-needed warranties, service plans etc, known in the industry as 'cheese'. The wholesale base price is listed on the cryptic price tag in the string of numbers near the bar code. Know how to decipher it and you get things at cost, with little to no commission to the sales persons. Whether or not this is fair, is more of a moral question than a financial one.

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