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May 6, 2013
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Diagnotes Inc., an Indianapolis-based health IT company, announced today that it has closed on $1 million in funding from life sciences and early-stage growth company investors. The investment group was led by Indiana University’s Innovate Indiana Fund and includes BioCrossroads’ Indiana Seed Fund II, Stepstone Angels and other investors. The funding will help Diagnotes commercialize its communication system for on-call health care providers. The Diagnotes system allows providers and patients to connect with on-call doctors and nurses while delivering key patient information from the electronic health record to the point of care.

Endocyte Inc. recorded $14.5 million in revenue during the first quarter and a loss of $3.9 million, or 11 cents per share. The West Lafayette-based drug development firm is still working with European regulators to win approval to launch its first drug, vintafolide. The drug, targeted for drug-resistant ovarian cancer, would be commercialized with New Jersey-based Merck & Co. Inc. Merck’s payment last year of $120 million is Endocyte’s sole source of revenue. The company’s cash pile declined during the first quarter from $201.4 million to $185.9 million. Endocyte officials reaffirmed their predictions that the company will have cash and cash equivalents between $145 million and $160 million at the end of 2013.

Franciscan St. Francis Health has partnered with WhatNext.com, a Carmel-based online support network that matches up cancer patients according to their diagnosis, stage and age. More than 10,000 Americans have registered to use WhatNext.com, including 400 patients in Indiana. “People are trying to make sense of a whole universe of new and staggering volume of medical information at the same time they are trying to figure out what’s next and to stay emotionally strong,” said David Wasilewski, who launched WhatNext.com in September 2011. “Our site helps patients benefit from those who have been there.”

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  1. Those of you yelling to deport them all should at least understand that the law allows minors (if not from a bordering country) to argue for asylum. If you don't like the law, you can petition Congress to change it. But you can't blindly scream that they all need to be deported now, unless you want your government to just decide which laws to follow and which to ignore.

  2. 52,000 children in a country with a population of nearly 300 million is decimal dust or a nano-amount of people that can be easily absorbed. In addition, the flow of children from central American countries is decreasing. BL - the country can easily absorb these children while at the same time trying to discourage more children from coming. There is tension between economic concerns and the values of Judeo-Christian believers. But, I cannot see how the economic argument can stand up against the values of the believers, which most people in this country espouse (but perhaps don't practice). The Governor, who is an alleged religious man and a family man, seems to favor the economic argument; I do not see how his position is tenable under the circumstances. Yes, this is a complicated situation made worse by politics but....these are helpless children without parents and many want to simply "ship" them back to who knows where. Where are our Hoosier hearts? I thought the term Hoosier was synonymous with hospitable.

  3. Illegal aliens. Not undocumented workers (too young anyway). I note that this article never uses the word illegal and calls them immigrants. Being married to a naturalized citizen, these people are criminals and need to be deported as soon as humanly possible. The border needs to be closed NOW.

  4. Send them back NOW.

  5. deport now

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