IBJNews

Company news

February 17, 2014
Keywords
Back to TopE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Fritz French and Richard DiMarchi have raised $1.7 million from venture capitalists to launch Calibrium LLC, a biotech company that will develop diabetes drugs. French and DiMarchi were leaders of Marcadia Biotech Inc., which developed diabetes drugs based on DiMarchi's research as a chemistry professor at Indiana University. They sold the company for $287 million to Switzerland-based Roche in late 2010. In November, Calibrium struck a deal with Indiana University to fund 10 researchers in DiMarchi’s chemistry lab in Bloomington. Then in December, Calibrium secured convertible debt investments from two of the venture capital firms that backed Marcadia—San Francisco-based 5AM Ventures and Seattle-based Frazier Healthcare. Calibrium has hired Kristin Sherman as its chief financial officer; she held the same position at Marcadia. French said he expects more members of the Marcadia team to join Calibrium as its work advances.

Nearly two-thirds of the state’s nursing homes are now participating in partnerships with county-owned hospitals that effectively double their profit margins. The partnerships allow both hospitals and nursing homes to draw down extra federal money, which appears to give nursing homes at least 2 percent on top of their average profit margin of 2 percent. According to data from the Indiana State Department of Health, 329 nursing homes have sold their licenses to county-owned hospitals—63 percent of all nursing homes in the state and nearly 70 percent of those that offer beds to Medicaid patients. The partnerships with county-owned hospitals trigger larger payments from the federal agency that oversees the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Those payments average $71.54 per day for each Medicaid patient, according to analysis of Indiana data by the accounting firm Myers and Stauffer LC. It is unclear exactly how the hositals and nursing homes split that money, which totaled $313 million statewide last year. But Indiana Health Care Association officials said hospitals are paying nursing homes management fees that net out to about 2 percent of the nursing homes’ net patient revenue.

Hall Render Killian Heath & Lyman, the nation's largest health-care-focused law firm, ranked eighth on The Hill newspaper's 2013 top 10 list of Washington, D.C., lobbying firms based on the number of new client registrations. Last year, Indianapolis-based Hall Render registered 28 new clients. The firm created its federal legislative and regulatory advisory practice in 2012. The practice includes attorneys John Williams and John Render, as well as Andrew Coats, the son of Indiana Sen. Dan Coats.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. You are correct that Obamacare requires health insurance policies to include richer benefits and protects patients who get sick. That's what I was getting at when I wrote above, "That’s because Obamacare required insurers to take all customers, regardless of their health status, and also established a floor on how skimpy the benefits paid for by health plans could be." I think it's vital to know exactly how much the essential health benefits are costing over previous policies. Unless we know the cost of the law, we can't do a cost-benefit analysis. Taxes were raised in order to offset a 31% rise in health insurance premiums, an increase that paid for richer benefits. Are those richer benefits worth that much or not? That's the question we need to answer. This study at least gets us started on doing so.

  2. *5 employees per floor. Either way its ridiculous.

  3. Jim, thanks for always ready my stuff and providing thoughtful comments. I am sure that someone more familiar with research design and methods could take issue with Kowalski's study. I thought it was of considerable value, however, because so far we have been crediting Obamacare for all the gains in coverage and all price increases, neither of which is entirely fair. This is at least a rigorous attempt to sort things out. Maybe a quixotic attempt, but it's one of the first ones I've seen try to do it in a sophisticated way.

  4. In addition to rewriting history, the paper (or at least your summary of it) ignores that Obamacare policies now must provide "essential health benefits". Maybe Mr Wall has always been insured in a group plan but even group plans had holes you could drive a truck through, like the Colts defensive line last night. Individual plans were even worse. So, when you come up with a study that factors that in, let me know, otherwise the numbers are garbage.

  5. You guys are absolutely right: Cummins should build a massive 80-story high rise, and give each employee 5 floors. Or, I suppose they could always rent out the top floors if they wanted, since downtown office space is bursting at the seams (http://www.ibj.com/article?articleId=49481).

ADVERTISEMENT