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Dramatic rehiring as IRT fills Stolen spot

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Suzanne Sweeney was expected to walk into the offices of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra this coming Monday and start her first day as vice president of finance. Instead, she'll be staying in more familiar territory.

Sweeney, who has served as associate managing director and chief financial officer at the Indiana Repertory Theatre since 2007, on Friday was named the IRT's managing director and chief operating officer.

The performing arts financial executive had been recruited for the ISO job in March by new CEO Gary Ginstling. But circumstances took a dramatic turn when her former supervisor, IRT Managing Director Steven Stolen, announced Thursday that he accepted a new job heading up the Indianapolis branch of charter-school developer Rocketship Education.

The IRT board quickly went after Sweeney for the vacated position, announcing  Friday that she would be unpacking her bags in her former digs rather than a few blocks away at the ISO.

In a press release, IRT board chairman Dr. Gene Tempel acknowledged that the boomerang move was “highly unusual,” adding, “with the announcement this week that Steven was leaving, our board moved quickly and asked the question who was the best one to take his place. Suzanne's name quickly came to the top so we approached her this morning and she accepted."

The change also means a management-team restructuring that includes changing Artistic Director Janet Allen’s title to Executive and Artistic Director/CEO.

In September, the drama moves onstage as the IRT kicks off its 42nd season with “The Crucible.”

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