IBJNews

First Financial changes local leadership as it expands

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

The bank known for its oddball, pale-yellow signage is reshuffling management locally as it continues a statewide expansion.

Cincinnati-based First Financial Bancorp, which has only been in the metropolitan Indianapolis market since 2008, has tapped former Old National Bank executive Steve Spicer as Indianapolis market president.

steve spicer first financial mug Steve Spicer

Most recently, Spicer was a senior vice president of corporate banking at  Evansville-based Old National. His 30-year career also includes roles at Huntington Bank, Fifth Third Bank and JPMorgan Chase.

Spicer succeeds Mary Jo Kennelly, who moved to a senior vice president role at First Financial.

Meanwhile, Kevin Langford, who is president of Indiana operations and of the bank’s consumer division in three states, has moved to Carmel from Cincinnati.

Langford said he wants to have tighter connections with the bank’s growing footprint in the state. Last month, First Financial announced it is entering the Fort Wayne market, with an eye on commercial lending and residential mortgages.

The bank also has offices in northwestern Indiana, including Lake County. Its 2009 purchase of branches from the failed Irwin Union Bank gave it a presence in the Columbus area as well as in Franklin, Carmel and Avon.

First Financial’s most substantial retail move into the metro area came in 2011, when it bought 22 branches of Michigan-based Flagstar Bank.

Given how crowded the Indianapolis banking market has become, “the smart move is to get somebody who will sell you their locations,” said Steve Schenck, who formerly ran Regions Bank’s local operations and is now a principal at The Schenck Group at Merrill Lynch..

First Financial has more than 110 employees in the metro area and has regional offices at 433 N. Capitol Ave.

Langford declined to elaborate on additional growth plans this year.  “We’d like to see significant growth and become one of the largest players in Indianapolis," he said.

The bank ranked 14th-biggest locally in IBJ’s most recent Book of Lists.

First Financial Bancorp has about $6.5 billion in assets, or roughly the size of Indiana National Bank when it was acquired in the early 1990s by NBD.

By comparison, First Financial’s fellow Cincinnati-based competitor, Fifth Third, has assets of $103 billion.

The ever-more-crowded metro bank market hasn’t deterred outsiders from trying to get a piece of the pie—even smaller players.

For example, Warsaw-based Lake City Bank recently built a retail branch in Fishers, after having set up an office in Carmel a few years earlier.  It’s closing in on $80 million in deposits locally.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. A Tilted Kilt at a water park themed hotel? Who planned that one? I guess the Dad's need something to do while the kids are on the water slides.

  2. Don't come down on the fair for offering drinks. This is a craft and certainly one that belongs in agriculture due to ingredients. And for those worrying about how much you can drink. I'm sure it's more to do with liability than anything else. They don't want people suing for being over served. If you want a buzz, do a little pre-drinking before you go.

  3. I don't drink but go into this "controlled area" so my friend can drink. They have their 3 drink limit and then I give my friend my 3 drink limit. How is the fair going to control this very likely situation????

  4. I feel the conditions of the alcohol sales are a bit heavy handed, but you need to realize this is the first year in quite some time that beer & wine will be sold at the fair. They're starting off slowly to get a gauge on how it will perform this year - I would assume if everything goes fine that they relax some of the limits in the next year or couple of years. That said, I think requiring the consumption of alcohol to only occur in the beer tent is a bit much. That is going to be an awkward situation for those with minors - "Honey, I'm getting a beer... Ok, sure go ahead... Alright see you in just a min- half an hour."

  5. This might be an effort on the part of the State Fair Board to manage the risk until they get a better feel for it. However, the blanket notion that alcohol should not be served at "family oriented" events is perhaps an oversimplification. and not too realistic. For 15 years, I was a volunteer at the Indianapolis Air Show, which was as family oriented an event as it gets. We sold beer donated by Monarch Beverage Company and served by licensed and trained employees of United Package Liquors who were unpaid volunteers. And where did that money go? To central Indiana children's charities, including Riley Hospital for Children! It's all about managing the risk.

ADVERTISEMENT