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2011 Forty Under 40: Jenna Barnett

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About me...
Jenna Barnett
Commercial real estate broker
Partner
Newmark Knight Frank Halakar
37
Web sites:
Social media:
On my hip:
iPhone
Most-used apps:
QuickOffice
Score Mobile
Gilt Groupe
QuickBooks
New York Times
Wall Street Journal
ABC Player
Favorite stuff:
Books, including "Outliers: The Story of Success" and "Good To Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't;" movies, including "The Shawshank Redemption," "Tombstone" and "Fletch"
 

As one of the top commercial real estate brokers in Indianapolis, Jenna Barnett has a strong instinct for matching the right businesses with the right properties.

“I love what I do. It pulls together a lot of different aspects of business,” said Barnett, who grew up near West Lafayette and studied finance at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.

“I’ve been fortunate to work with some of the most successful companies in Indianapolis,” Barnett said. “Watching them grow and thrive, and being in touch with that level of energy at those companies is very rewarding.”

Her client list is a who’s who of top local companies: ExactTarget, Blue & Co., Software Engineering Professionals, DSS Consulting and Axis Architecture, among others.

The one downside to her business, she said, is that it tends to be 100-percent commission. “If you can overcome that, make some personal sacrifices,” it can become very worthwhile, she said.

She joined Indianapolis-based Halakar Properties Inc., an independent commercial real estate company, in 2005, and is partners with Ralph Balber and Todd Maurer, son of IBJ co-owner Mickey Maurer.

On Jan. 1, Halakar affiliated with Newmark Knight Frank, a global real estate company headquartered in New York City, and will be known locally as Newmark Knight Frank Halakar.

A self-described entrepreneur, Barnett enjoys working at the company, where being part of the ownership team gives her independence and flexibility.

The flexibility is especially important so she can spend as much time as possible with her family. She and her husband have two sons, 6 and 4.

A young family is one reason she plans business trips to be as compact as possible. “I’m pretty well-connected regardless of where I am,” thanks to her laptop and iPhone.

She is wrapping up a term as president of the Women’s Auxiliary of Noble of Indiana, an organization that serves people with special needs.

“I just fell in love with the organization and the impact Noble makes on people’s lives every day,” she said. “Outside of spending time with my own family, it’s the most rewarding thing I do.”•

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  1. I took Bruce's comments to highlight a glaring issue when it comes to a state's image, and therefore its overall branding. An example is Michigan vs. Indiana. Michigan has done an excellent job of following through on its branding strategy around "Pure Michigan", even down to the detail of the rest stops. Since a state's branding is often targeted to visitors, it makes sense that rest stops, being that point of first impression, should be significant. It is clear that Indiana doesn't care as much about the impression it gives visitors even though our branding as the Crossroads of America does place importance on travel. Bruce's point is quite logical and accurate.

  2. I appreciated the article. I guess I have become so accustomed to making my "pit stops" at places where I can ALSO get gasoline and something hot to eat, that I hardly even notice public rest stops anymore. That said, I do concur with the rationale that our rest stops (if we are to have them at all) can and should be both fiscally-responsible AND designed to make a positive impression about our state.

  3. I don't know about the rest of you but I only stop at these places for one reason, and it's not to picnic. I move trucks for dealers and have been to rest areas in most all 48 lower states. Some of ours need upgrading no doubt. Many states rest areas are much worse than ours. In the rest area on I-70 just past Richmond truckers have to hike about a quarter of a mile. When I stop I;m generally in a bit of a hurry. Convenience,not beauty, is a primary concern.

  4. Community Hospital is the only system to not have layoffs? That is not true. Because I was one of the people who was laid off from East. And all of the LPN's have been laid off. Just because their layoffs were not announced or done all together does not mean people did not lose their jobs. They cherry-picked people from departments one by one. But you add them all up and it's several hundred. And East has had a dramatic drop I in patient beds from 800 to around 125. I know because I worked there for 30 years.

  5. I have obtained my 6 gallon badge for my donation of A Positive blood. I'm sorry to hear that my donation was nothing but a profit center for the Indiana Blood Center.

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