IBJNews

Fundex settles trademark suit with game inventor

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
On The Beat Industry News In Brief

Fundex Games Ltd. has given up its rights to the game Chronology as part of its settlement of a trademark-infringement suit brought last March by local inventor Jane Ruemmele.

Ruemmele alleged in her lawsuit that Plainfield-based Fundex had sold numerous copies of the game, but hadn’t provided any royalty statements or payments since October 2008. She also alleged that the company continued to sell the game after its license agreement expired on March 31, 2008.

Ruemmele, a Marion County public defender, first licensed the game in 1995 through a company Fundex acquired in 2007.

In Chronology, players try to place historical events and inventions in their proper place in time. The first player to accumulate 10 cards in calendar sequence wins.
 

Ruemmele Ruemmele

Ruemmele said she was disappointed that she couldn’t strike a new deal with Fundex. “They were local and it would have been an easy way to do business.”

Nevertheless, she’s pleased with other terms of the settlement, and she’s working with a new publisher. Ruemmele hopes to see Chronology back in wide distribution before next Christmas, and possibly in electronic format.

Fundex was going to stop selling the game in any case, attorney Spiro Bereveskos of Woodard, Emhardt, Moriarty, McNett & Henry, LLP said. “We worked out a deal to go our separate ways.”

Chronology is still on the market through Fundex. Ruemmele said the settlement allows the company to sell off what was already in the pipeline.

Notice of the settlement was filed last month in the U.S. District Court of Southern Indiana. Ruemmele declined to disclose financial details.

Fundex settled a similar lawsuit in October with the inventor of Phase 10, the world’s second-best-selling card game.

Michigan inventor Kenneth Johnson had accused the company in December 2008 of copyright infringement, trademark dilution, fraud, conversion and theft.

Details of that settlement were not available. Fundex still has rights to the game, which sells more than 3 million copies a year, second only to Uno.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. I am so impressed that the smoking ban FAILED in Kokomo! I might just move to your Awesome city!

  2. way to much breweries being built in indianapolis. its going to be saturated market, if not already. when is enough, enough??

  3. This house is a reminder of Hamilton County history. Its position near the interstate is significant to remember what Hamilton County was before the SUPERBROKERs, Navients, commercial parks, sprawling vinyl villages, and acres of concrete retail showed up. What's truly Wasteful is not reusing a structure that could still be useful. History isn't confined to parks and books.

  4. To compare Connor Prairie or the Zoo to a random old house is a big ridiculous. If it were any where near the level of significance there wouldn't be a major funding gap. Put a big billboard on I-69 funded by the tourism board for people to come visit this old house, and I doubt there would be any takers, since other than age there is no significance whatsoever. Clearly the tax payers of Fishers don't have a significant interest in this project, so PLEASE DON'T USE OUR VALUABLE MONEY. Government money is finite and needs to be utilized for the most efficient and productive purposes. This is far from that.

  5. I only tried it 2x and didn't think much of it both times. With the new apts plus a couple other of new developments on Guilford, I am surprised it didn't get more business. Plus you have a couple of subdivisions across the street from it. I hope Upland can keep it going. Good beer and food plus a neat environment and outdoor seating.

ADVERTISEMENT