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Leases/leasing contracts

January 29, 2013
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-Harshman Property Services LLC has been hired to lease and manage The Barrister Building at 155 E. Market St. and The Stock Yards Bank Building at 136 E. Market St. The buildings encompass 115,000 square feet of office space. Harshman's leasing representatives are Larry Harshman and Dawn McClanahan.

-Surgical Care Affiliates leased a 14,916-square-foot office building at Meridian Mark II, 11711 N. Meridian St., Carmel. The tenant was represented by Sam Smith of Colliers International. The landlord, Zeller Realty Group, was represented by Mark Vollbrecht of Zeller Realty Group.

-CD Enterprises leased 10,732 square feet of office space at 10 W. Market St. The tenant was represented by Jon Owens of Cassidy Turley. The landlord, HDG Mansur, was represented by Andrew Martin, Dave Moore, Darrin Boyd and Bennett Williams of Cassidy Turley.
 
-Indiana Department of Administration leased 9,518 square feet of office space at 30 S. Meridian St. The tenant was represented by Michael Corr and Jake Sturman of Jones Lang LaSalle. The landlord, Kite Realty Group, was represented by John Crisp and Mike Semler of Cassidy Turley.

-The Phoenix Group Inc. renewed its lease for 9,106 square feet of office space at 164 South Park Blvd., Greenwood. The tenant was represented by Rick Suja of Colliers International. The landlord, South Park Group LLC, was represented by Brian Dell of Summit Realty Group.

-Orbital Customs Inc. leased 4,960 square feet at 9750 E. 150th St., Noblesville. The tenant was represented by Cam Kucic of Summit Realty Group. The landlord, Noblesville Business Partners LLC, was represented by Chip Barnes of Jones Lang Lasalle.  

-Mutual of Omaha Insurance Co. leased 4,388 square feet of office space at 9100 Keystone Crossing. The tenant was represented by R.J. Rudolph, Tom Osborne, and Kim Hartman of Colliers International. The landlord, Keystone Investors LLC, was represented by Abby Cooper and John Robinson of Jones Lang LaSalle.

-The Steritech Group Inc. renewed its lease for 3,980 square feet at 122 South Park Blvd., Greenwood. The landlord, South Park Group LLC, was represented by Brian Dell of Summit Realty Group. The tenant represented itself.

-Scientific Image Center Management Inc. leased 3,497 square feet of office space at 12265 Hancock St., Carmel. The tenant was represented by Timothy Craft of CBRE. The landlord, Carriger Properties LLC, was represented by Bryan Miller of Cassidy Turley.

-DCT Industrial Supply Co. leased 2,700 square feet at 5855 Kopetsky Drive. The landlord, Gateway South Industrial Park, was represented by Brian Dell of Summit Realty Group. The tenant represented itself.

-PEARings Frozen Yogurt & Beyond leased 2,177 square feet of retail space at 6 W. Washington St. The landlord, Two North Meridian Co., was represented by Nicholas Wright of Newbridge Commercial Real Estate. The tenant represented itself.

-Lumberman's Underwriting Alliance leased 2,125 square feet of office space at 10333 N. Meridian St. The landlord, Cassidy Turley acting as court-appointed receiver, was represented by Darrin Boyd and Dave Moore of Cassidy Turley. The tenant represented itself.

-DAST Consulting leased 1,713 square feet of office space at 5455 W. 86th St.  The landlord, Polaris Commercial Investments LLC, was represented by Dan Baldini of Polaris Real Estate. The tenant represented itself.

-Penn Station East Coast Subs leased 1,600 square feet at 2558 E. State Road 44, Shelbyville. The tenant was represented by Nicholas Wright of Newbridge Commercial Real Estate. The landlord, SHIV Development LLC, represented itself.

-Body by GymRoots leased 1,523 square feet of office space at 11946 11980 Fishers Crossing Drive, Fishers. The landlord, Shamrock Builders, was represented by Darrin Boyd and Dave Moore of Cassidy Turley. The tenant represented itself.
 
-Star Nails leased 1,400 square feet of retail space in Stafford Crossing, 2230 Stafford Road, Plainfield.  The landlord, LOR Corp., was represented by Brett Burch and Jeff Daniel of Valenti Real Estate Services Inc. The tenant represented itself.  
        
-Defender Direct leased 1,059 square feet at 5455 W. 86th St. The landlord, Polaris Commercial Investments LLC, was represented by Dan Baldini of Polaris Real Estate. The tenant represented itself.

-The Gabriel Project extended its 684-square-foot lease at 5455 W 86th St. The landlord, Polaris Commercial Investments LLC, was represented by Dan Baldini of Polaris Real Estate. The tenant represented itself.
 

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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

  4. GOOD DAY to you I am Mr Howell Henry, a Reputable, Legitimate & an accredited money Lender. I loan money out to individuals in need of financial assistance. Do you have a bad credit or are you in need of money to pay bills? i want to use this medium to inform you that i render reliable beneficiary assistance as I'll be glad to offer you a loan at 2% interest rate to reliable individuals. Services Rendered include: *Refinance *Home Improvement *Inventor Loans *Auto Loans *Debt Consolidation *Horse Loans *Line of Credit *Second Mortgage *Business Loans *Personal Loans *International Loans. Please write back if interested. Upon Response, you'll be mailed a Loan application form to fill. (No social security and no credit check, 100% Guaranteed!) I Look forward permitting me to be of service to you. You can contact me via e-mail howellhenryloanfirm@gmail.com Yours Sincerely MR Howell Henry(MD)

  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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