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Leasing/leasing contracts

November 27, 2012
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-Viet Hoa International Supermarket leased 25,200 square feet at Castleton Plaza, 6336 E. 82nd St. The tenant was represented by Tracey Holtzman of Midland Atlantic Properties. The landlord, Castleton Plaza LP, was represented by Josh Broadbent of The Broadbent Co.

-Shoe Carnival Inc. leased 25,000 square feet of retail space at 7565 US 31 South. The tenant was represented by Bob Byrne of Edge Commercial Real Estate LLC. The landlord, Nationwide, was represented by Bill French of Cassidy Turley.

-CPI Communications Products Inc. leased 13,072 square feet of office space at 7301 E. 90th St., Indianapolis. The tenant was represented by Ralph Balber of Newmark Knight Frank Halakar. The landlord, Westminster Funds, was represented by Bryan Miller and Todd Vannatta of Cassidy Turley.

-Teddy’s Burger Joint leased 6,692 square feet of retail space in Merchants' Square, 1235 Keystone Way, Carmel. The tenant was represented by Bart Jackson and Scot Courtney of Lee & Associates. The landlord, Merchants 450 LLC, was represented by Gilli Zofan of Ramco-Gershenson Properties Trust.

-Blume & Blume leased 6,400 square feet of industrial space at 4350 W. 10th St. The landlord, Speedway Industrial Park, was represented by Bill Byram of Cassidy Turley. The tenant represented itself.   

-Federal Insurance Co. leased 5,658 square feet of office space at One American Square at Illinois and Ohio streets. The tenant was represented by Nick Arterburn of CBRE. The landlord, American United Life Insurance Co., was represented by Jon Owens and Russ Van Til of Cassidy Turley.  

-Papa Joes Jr. leased 4,000 square feet at Avon Station, 8100 E US 36, Avon. The tenant was represented by Janice Paine of Colliers International. The landlord, Avon Station Inc., was represented by Michael Cranfill of Sitehawk Retail Real Estate.

-Bruce D. Brattain leased 3,043 square feet of office space at 151 N. Delaware St. The tenant was represented by Bill Moore of Cassidy Turley. The landlord, Hertz Investment Group, was represented by Crystal Houston of CBRE.
 
-Jack’s Donuts leased 1,611 square feet at The Bonn Building, 13578 E. 131st St., Fishers. The landlord, Bonn Building Partners LLC, was represented by Steve Delaney and Keith Fried of Sitehawk Retail Real Estate. The tenant represented itself.

-Pizza Hut leased 1,124 square feet at Mohawk Landing, 729 S. Rangeline Road, Carmel. The tenant was represented by Michael Cranfill of Sitehawk Retail Real Estate. The landlord, Mohawk Investments LLC, represented itself.

-Pizza Hut leased 1,200 square feet at Arlington Square, 5914 E. 10th St. The tenant was represented by Michael Cranfill of Sitehawk Retail Real Estate. The landlord, Carnegie Cos. Inc., was represented by Thomas A Cortese III of Acorn Group Inc.  

-Pizza Hut leased 1,200 square feet at New Palestine Plaza, 1396 S 600 West, New Palestine. The tenant was represented by Michael Cranfill of Sitehawk Retail Real Estate. The landlord, New Palestine Plaza Inc., represented itself.
 

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  1. Looking at the two companies - in spite of their relative size to one another -- Ricker's image is (by all accounts) pretty solid and reputable. Their locations are clean, employees are friendly and the products they offer are reasonably priced. By contrast, BP locations are all over the place and their reputation is poor, especially when you consider this is the same "company" whose disastrous oil spill and their response was nothing short of irresponsible should tell you a lot. The fact you also have people who are experienced in franchising saying their system/strategy is flawed is a good indication that another "spill" has occurred and it's the AM-PM/Ricker's customers/company that are having to deal with it.

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  5. I live downtown Indy and had to be in downtown Chicago for a meeting. In other words, I am the target demographic for this train. It leaves at 6:00-- early but doable. Then I saw it takes 5+ hours. No way. I drove. I'm sure I paid 3 to 5 times as much once you factor in gas, parking, and tolls, but it was reimbursed so not a factor for me. Any business traveler is going to take the option that gets there quickly and reliably... and leisure travelers are going to take the option that has a good schedule and promotional prices (i.e., Megabus). Indy to Chicago is the right distance (too short to fly but takes several hours to drive) that this train could be extremely successful even without subsidies, if they could figure out how to have several frequencies (at least 3x/day) and make the trip in a reasonable amount of time. For those who have never lived on the east coast-- Amtrak is the #1 choice for NY-DC and NY-Boston. They have the Acela service, it runs almost every hour, and it takes you from downtown to downtown. It beats driving and flying hands down. It is too bad that we cannot build something like this in the midwest, at least to connect the bigger cities.

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