IBJNews

New library standards to enhance online access

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Hoosiers will have more access to the Internet and to public library materials across the state under a new set of standards adopted by the Indiana State Library and Historical Board, library officials said Monday.

The Board unanimously approved the new requirements on Jan. 15 this year, and they will take effect Jan. 1, 2011, pending approval from the governor and attorney general.

The standards center on giving patrons more access to the Internet, requiring libraries to have a set number of computers determined by the size of the population they serve.

"Many people in all areas of the state, whether it be rural or urban, don't have access at their home," Drew Griffiths, spokesman for the State Library, said Monday. "They rely on their public libraries to access the Internet."

Libraries are also required to maintain a Web site and online library catalog accessible from any computer connected to the Internet.

Deputy State Librarian Jim Corridan said this requirement was potentially the most costly of the standards but that the State Library would provide free software to offset costs.

Public libraries can get a free Web site through the State Library. Corridan said the State Library would cover the cost of hosting and training, while the libraries would maintain the sites.

The State Library also provides free software to help libraries build a required online catalog. Evergreen Indiana is an automated system that allows libraries to put their catalogs online. It automatically tracks catalog information at all Evergreen libraries. Corridan said about 70 libraries — nearly a third of the state's public libraries — are already using Evergreen. They system allows patrons to check out materials from any Evergreen library and return them to any network library.

The new requirements have three levels of compliance, resulting in basic, enhanced, and exceptional designations. Griffiths said more than half of the state's libraries already meet the new criteria, while many others required only minor changes.

Library Director Laurel Setser said the Avon-Washington Township Public Library meets the new standards, mostly at the enhanced level. She said the goal was to eventually reach the exceptional designation, but that she was worried about how that will happen financially.

"I think the flip side will be the money issue, and the financial resources it will take to reach some of those exemplary levels," Setser said. "I think we're all concerned about what the revenue will be in the next couple years, so there may be some tough decisions that will have to be made whether we can meet exemplary goals."

Griffiths said the aim of the new standards was to standardize and maximize the services provided to Hoosiers.

"Basically, the goal is to have equitable access at public libraries throughout the state in terms of library services," he said. "Indiana's already known as one of the best in terms of library services. This sort of just ensures that we continue to be among the nation's best."

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

ADVERTISEMENT