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NFP of NOTE: Giving Sum

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Not-For-Profit of Note


Giving Sum
615 N. Alabama St., Suite 119
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Phone: (317) 847-2890
Fax: (317) 860-3232
Web site: www.givingsum.org
Founded: 2008
Paid employees: none (Giving Sum is volunteer-run.)
Highest-paid staff member: not applicable
Top volunteers: founding members Ryan Brady, Darrin Brooks, Lindsay Doucette, Marty Posch

MISSION

Inspire and engage the next generation, mobilizing their passions, talents and resources to support innovative community initiatives.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Marty Posch, president
Darrin Brooks, vice president
Randy Henry, treasurer
Ryan Brady, secretary
Lindsay Doucette, founding member

PROGRAMS

Support for innovation: Members contribute $500 to a collective grant fund. They also commit to using their talents and voice to support innovative social benefit ideas. They annually use an objective and democratic process to decide how to allocate $50,000 of financial support, volunteer time and advocacy efforts.

Lunch with Leaders: Giving Sum members sit down with central Indiana's top business, government and not-for-profit leaders. Discussions focus around why that leader gives back to the community and how philanthropy has impacted that leader's life. Lunch discussions are held once per month, usually at the place of the leader's employment.

FUND-RAISER

Ale Yeah! A microbrew festival benefiting Giving Sum, to be held in 2009 on Oct. 10 at the Rathskeller Biergarten. This year's innaugural event, Oct. 11, raised $9,171.

FINANCIAL PROFILE

2007 income: not applicable
2008 income: $60,000
2007 expenses: not applicable
2008 expenses: $57,000
2007 assets: not applicable
Fiscal year begins: Jan. 1

2008 income

Sponsorship: 12.5 percent
Fund-raiser: 12.5 percent
Membership contributions: 75 percent

2008 expenses

Marketing: 3.5 percent
Program supplies: 5 percent
Fundraiser: 3.5 percent
Grant: 88 percent

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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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