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Some council members still unsure about CIB budget

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The Capital Improvement Board’s controversial spending plan will face its final trial Monday night as the City-County Council takes up the city’s $1.1 billion budget for next year.

As of Friday, council members from both sides of the aisle expressed uncertainty about getting full support from their caucus for the $73.1 million CIB budget, which includes $10 million to operate Conseco Fieldhouse—lifting the financial burden from the Indiana Pacers.

Five of seven members of the council’s municipal corporations committee agreed last week to send the CIB proposal to the full council.

But Democratic minority leader Joanne Sanders said final passage of the budget was “very tenuous” among her 13-member caucus, and Council President Ryan Vaughn said some of his 14 fellow Republicans had not yet decided how they would vote.

Ed Coleman, the 29-member body’s lone Libertarian, said he did not plan to support it.

“There are folks unwilling to commit because of questions they’re still asking,” Vaughn said. “People obviously have a lot of concerns about it because the public is being very concerned about it.”

The Pacers funding has been a dicey issue during city budget hearings against the backdrop of financial shortfalls for the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library and the IndyGo bus system.

The municipal corporations committee approved a property tax shortfall appeal to help IndyGo next year. And raising the library’s tax rate in exchange for lowering the rate for a city economic-development fund will help the library generate enough money to pay employee retirement benefits next year. But the library will not be able to avert a 26-percent reduction in hours across the system.

During the Oct. 19 committee hearing, about 10 residents showed up to protest the funding for the Pacers, holding signs with slogans such as, “Just say no to the CIB”

The councilors, some of whom also expressed initial concerns about the CIB budget, said they shared in the discontent but thought it was important for the full council to review it.

It’s unclear, though, whether they’ll embrace that philosophy when it comes down to the final vote.

The overall city budget calls for cutting $22 million in local spending—reducing expenditures to roughly 2008 levels. That includes measures such as eliminating a police recruit class and implementing a pay and hiring freeze.

The city also plans to tap its $17.5 million rainy day fund.

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  • Trouble
    If the Republcians think they can vote for the CIB budget, including Pacer $10 million payout, without political consequences, they will be in for a rude awakening.
  • Don't do it. Do not pass this budget.
    So we'll spend our rainy day fund and we'll cancel a police recruit class and we'll cut an additional $22 million in local spending so we can boost the CIB budget to $73.1 million dollars. City county council. Don't do it. Don't you do it. You know the public is against this. Democrats hate that we're slashing library hours 26% and truly suffering on the streets waiting for a bus. Republicans hate that we're funding ever larger amounts for sports venues when everybody wants to cut spending. The CIB should be dismantled. We don't need it. Its like owning a boat. A great big hole in the water into which you shovel money. A Barnes & Thornburg revenue generator. A slush fund keeping Simon's Pacers afloat, even as the team appreciates in value should they be sold. Take a stand. Vote down this budget. The CIB budget ought to be cut to $35 million dollars. We don't need the CIB. We don't want the CIB. We don't trust the CIB. And we don't want to fund the CIB. These opinions are expressed by everyone, Republican and Democrat alike, all over the county. The only people pushing the CIB are insiders who, directly or indirectly, stand to benefit from the cities' largest, but not only, slush fund.

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  1. If what you stated is true, then this article is entirely inaccurate. "State sells bonds" is same as "State borrows money". Supposedly the company will "pay for them". But since we are paying the company, we are still paying for this road with borrowed money, even though the state has $2 billion in the bank.

  2. Andrew hit the nail on the head. AMTRAK provides terrible service and that is why the state has found a contractor to improve the service. More trips, on-time performance, better times, cleanliness and adequate or better restrooms. WI-FI and food service will also be provided. Transit from outlying areas will also be provided. I wouldn't take it the way it is but with the above services and marketing of the service,ridership will improve and more folks will explore Indy and may even want to move here.

  3. They could take the property using eminent domain and save money by not paying the church or building a soccer field and a new driveway. Ctrwd has monthly meetings open to all customers of the district. The meetings are listed and if the customers really cared that much they would show. Ctrwd works hard in every way they can to make sure the customer is put first. Overflows damage the surrounding environment and cost a lot of money every year. There have been many upgrades done through the years to help not send flow to Carmel. Even with the upgrades ctrwd cannot always keep up. I understand how a storage tank could be an eye sore, but has anyone thought to look at other lift stations or storage tanks. Most lift stations are right in the middle of neighborhoods. Some close to schools and soccer fields, and some right in back yards, or at least next to a back yard. We all have to work together to come up with a proper solution. The proposed solution by ctrwd is the best one offered so far.

  4. Fox has comments from several people that seem to have some inside information. I would refer to their website. Changed my whole opionion of this story.

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