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Washington Square area getting first new retail strip in three years

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A small retail center being built on the perimeter of Washington Square Mall is evidence there is still a market for new product when the stars align.

Thompson Thrift, based in Terre Haute and Carmel, has started construction on Washington Square Commons, a 9,000-square-foot retail strip at 10110 E. Washington St., at a major entrance to Washington Square Mall. The $2.1 million center, the first to be built in the Washington Square submarket in three years, is one of only a few new retail projects in the entire city.

Washington Square Commons will be anchored by The Vitamin Shoppe, which will open its fourth local outlet in 3,600 square feet, and Aspen Dental, whose 3,400-square-foot space will be its 16th Indianapolis location.

A 2,000-square-foot space remains, said Mark Perlstein, a broker for Sitehawk Retail Real Estate who represented the two tenants.

The submarket has its fair share of vacancies, Perlstein said, but the demographics are good and there hasn’t been much space available for lease that fronts East Washington Street.

“Both of these tenants will only lease in centers with high visibility and high traffic counts—and that’s what this center has,” he said.

Washington Square and Lafayette Square, its west side counterpart, often are lumped together as malls that are struggling, but the trade area around Washington Square is in much better shape, Perlstein said.

“There’s a pretty fair demand for space in that submarket,” said Perlstein, who said the demographics are very similar to what you’d find in Avon, a far west-side suburb with a reputation for growth.

The densely populated area within a three-mile radius of the Washington Square Commons site has an average household income of $59,000, higher than the city as a whole; in a one-mile radius it’s $74,000.

The last developer to take advantage of the submarket’s favorable demographics was Thomas English, whose Cherry Tree Crossing, finished in 2007, is now fully leased.

The quoted rent for the 32,000-square-foot center was $23 a square foot. English said tenants sometimes pay significantly more for just the right new space. Eyeglass World, one of the Cherry Tree Crossing tenants, pays almost $40 a square foot, he said.

The going rent for space that’s been vacated and must be backfilled is in the $10- to $12-a-foot range along Washington Street, said English. He said deals are being negotiated now for some vacant Washington Street spaces. Circuit City and Big Lots are among retailers that left big spaces to fill.

Thompson Thrift’s new development, which is being financed by Old National Bank, is on a one-acre site that housed a Denny’s restaurant until about a year ago. Thompson Thrift bought the site from Denny’s earlier this year and then leveled the restaurant to make way for construction.

Ashlee Boyd, Thompson Thrift’s senior vice president, said Washington Square Commons is one of four similarly sized projects the company is starting this month. The other three are in surrounding states. Last year the company finished two small projects in Avon.

Boyd said the recession has changed Thompson Thrift’s business plan. Up until a few years ago, the company’s goal was to build larger centers, like Cool Creek Village, an 85,000-square-foot property in Carmel anchored by an LA Fitness. With tenants and financing harder to come by, the company has shifted its focus to smaller preleased projects.

Donna Hovey, a retail broker for CB Richard Ellis, said even a small development in the current commercial real estate environment is significant. The location of the project in an area with great demographics and no new space available makes it a good opportunity for the developer, she said.

Recent road work on Washington Street that added medians and reduced the number of access points makes the site of the project—a main entrance to the mall with a traffic signal—a prime location, said Hovey.

Washington Square Commons was designed by Terre Haute-based DIG Architecture & Planning and is being built by Thompson Thrift’s construction unit. It is scheduled to open in October.

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  • a ray of hope...
    now if only someone would convince simon to bring in some shopping worthy stores to the mall! it really bites having to drive to all ends of the city! i think, "hey! if the only way they'll come into the community is by tearing down ugly buildings and building new ones... DO IT! we'll take it and maybe more will follow!" ps- a bookstore would be amazing!
  • Bookstore, anyone?
    How about a Barnes & Noble? Even a Half Price books? Surely, I am not the only one on the eastside that reads books?
  • National road Dude
    I disagree with the previous post. The future of the traditional shopping mall is changing. I personally havn't walked into a mall for several years. We want to see where are going and drive as close to it as possible. The addition of this small strip is a big boost to our Eastside shopping experience. To see new construction where an eyesore stood is a welcome sight.
  • Great News
    This is great news for the eastside. Cherry Creek Crossing was a great addition to the area and brought some retailers/restaurants to the area that we needed...McAllister's Deli, Qdoba plus it is a nice looking center.

    I'm glad we have someone who reconizes the great opportunity on the eastside.
  • I Disagree
    Normally, I'd agree with Overbuilt, but this project is removing a large, empty, eyesore (Denny's), so in this case, I think it's a plus for the area.
  • Overbuilt
    Why, in an overbuilt market with plenty of vacancy, are developers continuing to add even more space. You can't tell me there were not multiple, multiple locations where these tenants could have gone. Building new only further depresses the value of the existing buildings in the area with significant vacancy.

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  1. The east side does have potential...and I have always thought Washington Scare should become an outlet mall. Anyone remember how popular Eastgate was? Well, Indy has no outlet malls, we have to go to Edinburgh for the deep discounts and I don't understand why. Jim is right. We need a few good eastsiders interested in actually making some noise and trying to change the commerce, culture and stereotypes of the East side. Irvington is very progressive and making great strides, why can't the far east side ride on their coat tails to make some changes?

  2. Boston.com has an article from 2010 where they talk about how Interactions moved to Massachusetts in the year prior. http://www.boston.com/business/technology/innoeco/2010/07/interactions_banks_63_million.html The article includes a link back to that Inside Indiana Business press release I linked to earlier, snarkily noting, "Guess this 2006 plan to create 200-plus new jobs in Indiana didn't exactly work out."

  3. I live on the east side and I have read all your comments. a local paper just did an article on Washington square mall with just as many comments and concerns. I am not sure if they are still around, but there was an east side coalition with good intentions to do good things on the east side. And there is a facebook post that called my eastside indy with many old members of the eastside who voice concerns about the east side of the city. We need to come together and not just complain and moan, but come up with actual concrete solutions, because what Dal said is very very true- the eastside could be a goldmine in the right hands. But if anyone is going damn, and change things, it is us eastside residents

  4. Please go back re-read your economics text book and the fine print on the February 2014 CBO report. A minimum wage increase has never resulted in a net job loss...

  5. The GOP at the Statehouse is more interested in PR to keep their majority, than using it to get anything good actually done. The State continues its downward spiral.

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