IBJNews

2012 WOMAN OF INFLUENCE: Angela E. White

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Senior Consultant and CEO, Johnson Grossnickle and Associates

Sphere of Influence: As head of one of the city’s most successful philanthropy consulting firms, White has become a nationally respected expert on the not-for-profit world and the role of women in philanthropy.
 

white-angela-15col.jpgPhoto courtesy of Johnson Grossnickle and Associates

Angela White traces her early success to her education at St. Mary-of-the-Woods College in Terre Haute.

“The Sisters of Providence had a huge impact on my life,” said White, the CEO of the philanthropy consulting company Johnson Grossnickle and Associates in Greenwood. Her mother, a nurse-administrator, died of breast cancer during her freshman year, and the nuns nurtured the mind and soul of the young woman from Canton, Ill.

“At a women’s college you learn the self-confidence that you can do anything you want, that you can be anything you want,” she said. “You have strong women role models.”

White worked in development at the school for eight years after graduating, eventually becoming vice president for institutional advancement and handling a $15 million capital campaign.

She left and joined the University of Indianapolis as executive director of advancement.

At Johnson Grossnickle and Associates—JGA—she advises not-for-profit clients in matters of fundraising and strategy. Since 1996, she has worked with dozens of local clients, including Cathedral High School, University of Indianapolis, Butler University, Sisters of Providence and the Women’s Fund of Central Indiana, as well as national ones.

She is also a nationally recognized expert on women and philanthropy, and, as such, travels for speaking engagements.

There is no magic formula to fundraising, White said. After assessing the client’s situation, and determining their strengths, JGA advises clients on how to approach fundraising. The firm doesn’t do fundraising for the client.

“We work together and bring their expertise and value, come up with a joint solution of what works well for them,” she explained, noting that what works for one client isn’t necessarily the right thing for another. Many clients have become long-term clients. “The work changes, as do the clients’ needs.”

“I’ve had wonderful bosses, people who have really pushed me to grow,” said White. In turn, she has mentored others. “Mostly I do it with people who are interested in moving into the non-profit field or moving up in it.”

She and her husband, Matthew Donovan, who is the senior associate athletic director for development at UIndy, have two sons, Casey, 11, and Patrick, 8, who play a lot of sports. When the family is not running to practice or a game, they’re attending sporting and other events at UIndy.

“I have long given up on work-life balance,” said White, noting this is a challenge for many working parents. “I call it work-life integration. The juggling act is how it is.”

Every day is different, but most of her time is accounted for “working with clients or being with my kids.” Even her exercise time is shared with Wilson, the family golden retriever.

She is a cantor at her church, and one of the highlights of her choir experience was singing on the steps of St. Peter’s Cathedral in Rome during the 2006 canonization of Blessed Mother Theodore Guerin—St. Theodora—the founder of St. Mary-of-the-Woods.•

_____

Click here to return to the Women of Influence landing page.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. Looking at the two companies - in spite of their relative size to one another -- Ricker's image is (by all accounts) pretty solid and reputable. Their locations are clean, employees are friendly and the products they offer are reasonably priced. By contrast, BP locations are all over the place and their reputation is poor, especially when you consider this is the same "company" whose disastrous oil spill and their response was nothing short of irresponsible should tell you a lot. The fact you also have people who are experienced in franchising saying their system/strategy is flawed is a good indication that another "spill" has occurred and it's the AM-PM/Ricker's customers/company that are having to deal with it.

  2. Daniel Lilly - Glad to hear about your points and miles. Enjoy Wisconsin and Illinois. You don't care one whit about financial discipline, which is why you will blast the "GOP". Classic liberalism.

  3. Isn't the real reason the terrain? The planners under-estimated the undulating terrain, sink holes, karst features, etc. This portion of the route was flawed from the beginning.

  4. You thought no Indy was bad, how's no fans working out for you? THe IRl No direct competition and still no fans. Hey George Family, spend another billion dollars, that will fix it.

  5. I live downtown Indy and had to be in downtown Chicago for a meeting. In other words, I am the target demographic for this train. It leaves at 6:00-- early but doable. Then I saw it takes 5+ hours. No way. I drove. I'm sure I paid 3 to 5 times as much once you factor in gas, parking, and tolls, but it was reimbursed so not a factor for me. Any business traveler is going to take the option that gets there quickly and reliably... and leisure travelers are going to take the option that has a good schedule and promotional prices (i.e., Megabus). Indy to Chicago is the right distance (too short to fly but takes several hours to drive) that this train could be extremely successful even without subsidies, if they could figure out how to have several frequencies (at least 3x/day) and make the trip in a reasonable amount of time. For those who have never lived on the east coast-- Amtrak is the #1 choice for NY-DC and NY-Boston. They have the Acela service, it runs almost every hour, and it takes you from downtown to downtown. It beats driving and flying hands down. It is too bad that we cannot build something like this in the midwest, at least to connect the bigger cities.

ADVERTISEMENT