IBJNews

$1.5M plan to salvage Di Rimini nears finish line

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

The bank that owns the hulking pile of code violations known as Di Rimini at the southeast corner of Capitol Avenue and St. Clair Street expects to invest more than $1.5 million to finish the ill-fated project.

Louisville-based Stock Yards Bank & Trust, which last year took ownership of the vacant 31-unit apartment building at 733 N. Capitol Ave. after foreclosing on a $2.8 million loan, is working on a final round of city permit approvals that could allow construction to resume this year.

de rimini building 15colThe bank that owns the Di Rimini building hopes to resume construction this year. (IBJ Photo)

The city's Department of Code Enforcement is reviewing a permit application after the bank's proposed aesthetic fixes won approval in theory from the Department of Metropolitan Development under Regional Center design guidelines, DCE spokesman Al Ensley said.

DMD would give final sign-off after code enforcement blesses the project, a move that could happen at a hearing Feb. 6. City officials in August granted a minor zoning variance involving the building's height.

A land-use attorney representing the bank, Bingham Greenebaum Doll partner Mary Solida, hung up on a reporter after saying she could not comment. A bank spokesman did not immediately return a phone call.

Stock Yards told city officials months ago that it would have to spend $1.5 million bringing the structure up to code, DMD spokesman John Bartholomew said, though that figure likely has risen.

The bank is proposing several fixes, including adding brick to first-floor facades, lighting at each first-floor entrance, glass doors and canopies for first-floor entrances, a new stair tower clad in brick, improved landscaping and changing leasing-office space to retail. It would also have to invest in major improvements to the interior, including problems with handicap accessibility, to pass code enforcement.

The city ordered construction to stop in October 2010 after code enforcement and planning department officials discovered developer Jeff Sparks was building an entirely different structure than the one for which he had sought approval.

Despite the order, the owners began moving tenants into the building, leading the state's fire marshal to issue an emergency order barring occupancy. Violations of the Indiana building code included a lack of fire walls between apartment units or a working sprinkler system.

Michael Osborne, president of Near North Development Corp., worries the city will let the bank cut too many corners out of sympathy for the money it stands to lose on the deal. His group, which first voiced concerns over Di Rimini, opposes Regional Center approval for the project.

"A huge issue is the precedent that is set by compromising standards now. It was not the bank's fault, but it was a debacle," Osborne said. "To say, 'you made it half-way to the finish line, that's good enough.' That's not the kind of precedent you want to set. This is very much about not just this project, but the standard for the community and expectation for future projects as well."

ADVERTISEMENT

  • It's the bank's fault, Osborne
    "It was not the bank's fault, but it was a debacle," Osborne said. Of course it's the bank's fault. They had a note, which is a contract. That note gave them the legal ability to demand performance. They didn't. In fact, they were negligent in protecting their own interests as well as the interests of surrounding property owners. Of course it's their fault, at least indirectly. Who is this Osborne clown, and why is he speaking if he doesn't understand B Law 101?
  • Great writing
    "...hulking pile of code violations..." I love that.
  • just adding to the mess
    It will be just another area for trash to hang out in this area of downtown. There is enough crap in this area already, let's not add to it. What about the 4-5 story vacant bldg near this one, how about we do something with that too while we are at it.
  • And by "salvage"...
    I hope they mean "tear the mess down and start over."

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. If I were a developer I would be looking at the Fountain Square and Fletcher Place neighborhoods instead of Broad Ripple. I would avoid the dysfunctional BRVA with all of their headaches. It's like deciding between a Blackberry or an iPhone 5s smartphone. BR is greatly in need of updates. It has become stale and outdated. Whereas Fountain Square, Fletcher Place and Mass Ave have become the "new" Broad Ripples. Every time I see people on the strip in BR on the weekend I want to ask them, "How is it you are not familiar with Fountain Square or Mass Ave? You have choices and you choose BR?" Long vacant storefronts like the old Scholar's Inn Bake House and ZA, both on prominent corners, hurt the village's image. Many business on the strip could use updated facades. Cigarette butt covered sidewalks and graffiti covered walls don't help either. The whole strip just looks like it needs to be power washed. I know there is more to the BRV than the 700-1100 blocks of Broad Ripple Ave, but that is what people see when they think of BR. It will always be a nice place live, but is quickly becoming a not-so-nice place to visit.

  2. I sure hope so and would gladly join a law suit against them. They flat out rob people and their little punk scam artist telephone losers actually enjoy it. I would love to run into one of them some day!!

  3. Biggest scam ever!! Took 307 out of my bank ac count. Never received a single call! They prey on new small business and flat out rob them! Do not sign up with these thieves. I filed a complaint with the ftc. I suggest doing the same ic they robbed you too.

  4. Woohoo! We're #200!!! Absolutely disgusting. Bring on the congestion. Indianapolis NEEDS it.

  5. So Westfield invested about $30M in developing Grand Park and attendance to date is good enough that local hotel can't meet the demand. Carmel invested $180M in the Palladium - which generates zero hotel demand for its casino acts. Which Mayor made the better decision?

ADVERTISEMENT