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DINING: A little bit of truck, part 4

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Dining - A&E

I’ve tasted some good food these past few weeks, experienced friendly service and, occasionally, gotten my money’s worth as I focused this month’s dining columns on Indy’s four-wheel eateries. But it wasn’t until I found myself deep in the heart of Park 100, in a parking lot surrounded by nondescript office buildings that I found an undeniable benefit to food trucks: They offer a salvation in restaurant wastelands. At worst, they sure beat popping a Lean Cuisine into the office microwave. At best, well, you can get yourself a hearty korrito.

What’s a korrito? It’s the specialty of Seoul Grill, whose bright yellow and blue truck brightened up the asphalt landscape on my visit. The Korrito ($8) is a cousin to the burrito in which a tortilla is stuffed with either Daejigogi (pork) or Bulgogi (chopped ribeye steak) as well as kimchi fried rice, cilantro and cheese. I went with the Bulgogi, which took the hearty sandwich closer to cheesesteak territory, although the grilled tortilla and Seoul sauce gave it a taste distinct but not too exotic for those who, for adventure, make a Steak ’n Shake run.
 

ae-seoul-grill03print-1col.jpg The Korrito from Seoul Grill is stuffed with Bulgogi (ribeye steak) and kimchi fried rice. (IBJ Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

The Korrito came sided with a Twisted Potato, which would have been perfectly at home at the State Fair. A whole baked potato spiral cut and skewered, it had some deliciously thin, potato-chip-like sections, but most of it didn’t hold its oil well, ruining the center of too many slices.

Seoul Grill’s parking lot neighbor, In a Pita, offers a Falafel Sandwich ($6) better than those I’ve had in many local Middle Eastern restaurants. Here, the chickpea balls were given a little mashing before being installed in the pita, helping them flavorfully blend with their traditional surroundings. In a Pita also serves Pita Chips with Hummus, Honey and Feta, or Cinnamon and Sugar ($3 each), but I opted to side with a small cup of Orzo Salad ($3).

Apparently, pedigree helps in the truck business. Both of these are run by descendants of established Indy restaurateurs. Seoul Grill’s roots go back to Mama’s House and In a Pita descends from Khoury’s.

I thought I was done for the month. But, as I was writing this, word circulated around the office that the Some of This, Some of That truck had parked outside. Having sampled Po’boys elsewhere earlier this month, we opted for the Jambalaya ($7), Spicy Jerk Chicken ($10) and Cajun Burger ($6), none of which were served hot (I’m only a few feet and a flight of stairs away). The truck did manage to turn out a moist chicken quarter that fell off the bone and had just enough spice to wake us up during mid-day energy doldrums, although the other dishes lacked the requested kick. There was more satisfaction with the sides. Even the cold Red Beans and Rice were addictive, and the cornbread left me wanting to return for a whole tray.•

—Lou Harry

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Last in a month-long series of food truck dining reviews.

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  1. Aaron is my fav!

  2. Let's see... $25M construction cost, they get $7.5M back from federal taxpayers, they're exempt from business property tax and use tax so that's about $2.5M PER YEAR they don't have to pay, permitting fees are cut in half for such projects, IPL will give them $4K under an incentive program, and under IPL's VFIT they'll be selling the power to IPL at 20 cents / kwh, nearly triple what a gas plant gets, about $6M / year for the 150-acre combined farms, and all of which is passed on to IPL customers. No jobs will be created either other than an handful of installers for a few weeks. Now here's the fun part...the panels (from CHINA) only cost about $5M on Alibaba, so where's the rest of the $25M going? Are they marking up the price to drive up the federal rebate? Indy Airport Solar Partners II LLC is owned by local firms Johnson-Melloh Solutions and Telemon Corp. They'll gross $6M / year in triple-rate power revenue, get another $12M next year from taxpayers for this new farm, on top of the $12M they got from taxpayers this year for the first farm, and have only laid out about $10-12M in materials plus installation labor for both farms combined, and $500K / year in annual land lease for both farms (est.). Over 15 years, that's over $70M net profit on a $12M investment, all from our wallets. What a boondoggle. It's time to wise up and give Thorium Energy your serious consideration. See http://energyfromthorium.com to learn more.

  3. Markus, I don't think a $2 Billion dollar surplus qualifies as saying we are out of money. Privatization does work. The government should only do what private industry can't or won't. What is proven is that any time the government tries to do something it costs more, comes in late and usually is lower quality.

  4. Some of the licenses that were added during Daniels' administration, such as requiring waiter/waitresses to be licensed to serve alcohol, are simply a way to generate revenue. At $35/server every 3 years, the state is generating millions of dollars on the backs of people who really need/want to work.

  5. I always giggle when I read comments from people complaining that a market is "too saturated" with one thing or another. What does that even mean? If someone is able to open and sustain a new business, whether you think there is room enough for them or not, more power to them. Personally, I love visiting as many of the new local breweries as possible. You do realize that most of these establishments include a dining component and therefore are pretty similar to restaurants, right? When was the last time I heard someone say "You know, I think we have too many locally owned restaurants"? Um, never...

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