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Fishers / Local Government / Hamilton County / Elections / Regional News

Dems won't field candidate for Fishers mayor

July 2, 2014

Hamilton County Democrats have appointed four candidates to fill vacancies on the November ballot, but the party will not have a contender in Fishers’ first mayoral race.

Party Chairman Keith Clock told IBJ he does not plan to make additional appointments before the July 3 deadline, despite interest from “a couple” potential candidates—including one who decided to wait until next year to run.

A change in state law required Fishers to hold an election this year following residents’ 2012 vote to transform the fast-growing suburb from a town to a second-class city. Voters return to the polls in 2015 during the regular municipal election cycle.

“The whole idea of having one election after another is sort of silly anyway,” Clock said.

Appointed Town Manager Scott Fadness won the GOP primary for mayor with almost 47 percent of the vote, edging out five opponents.

Already the presumptive favorite in the heavily Republican area, Fadness now has a clear path to the post.

No Libertarian or independent candidates filed to run for mayor before their June 30 cutoff, said Hamilton County Election Administrator Kathy Richardson.

Three Democrats already were running for district seats on Fishers’ City Council, and the party selected Maryellen Bein as its candidate for one of three at-large positions.

The other ballot additions are Rosemary Dunkle, who is vying for the District 1 seat on Hamilton County Council;  Mike Davis, who is seeking election as Noblesville Township trustee; and Peggy Russell, who is pursuing a seat on the Noblesville Township board.

Democratic candidates also are running for Congress, the state Senate, state House, Sheridan Town Council and the Clay Township board.

Clock said it’s important to give voters options.

“I am pleased that these well-qualified candidates stepped forward to give Hamilton County voters more of a choice when it comes to vote on Election Day,” he said in a prepared statement.

Only 12 percent of Hamilton County voters turned out for the May primary.

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