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Property Lines
Scott Olson
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The Score
Anthony Schoettle
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North of 96th
Andrea Muirragui Davis
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The Dose
J.K. Wall
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Recent Blog Posts

Pretending to like new music

Bruce Hetrick
July 9, 2008
Comments(6)
Noted curmudgeon—and very smart and funny writer—Joe Queenan recently threw down the gauntlet at contemporary classical music and those who, in his view, claim to like it. Some notable quotes from his article “Admit It, You’re as Bored as...
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Smoking ban for 'Jersey Boys'

Bruce Hetrick
July 8, 2008
Comments(14)
Chris Jones at the Chicago Tribune reports that the Chicago production of "Jersey Boys" (an outstanding show, by the way--and that's me talking, not Jones) has gone smoke free. He's not talking about the theater. He's talking about the...
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Brandon Rush wants to mirror Miller

Cory Schouten
July 8, 2008
Comments(4)
Attention all real estate agents. The city’s soon-to-be newest millionaire is looking for a house. Brandon Rush said he expects to sign a contract to play for the Indiana Pacers tomorrow and will be...
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Match your wits with an Indian child

July 8, 2008
Comments(0)
Bob Compton has taken a few arrows in the back since he began screening the film he funded, â??2 Million Minutes,â?? last fall. Compton, who was a venture capitalist at CID Equity Partners before striking out on his own to bankroll...
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Ralston Square's new look

Cory Schouten
July 8, 2008
Comments(57)
A $60 million project slated for South Street between Meridian and Pennsylvania streets has a whole new look, along with a couple of anchor tenants. Plans for Ralston Square call for a Cambria Suites hotel, a BlackFinn Restaurant & Saloon...
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Hutcherson visits 'Journey' crowd

Bruce Hetrick
July 8, 2008
Comment(1)
Last night, the Heartland Film Festival (sorry, I mean Heartland Truly Moving Pictures--I'm still getting used to the new name) added some dessert to a packed advance screening of the new adventure flick "Journey to the Center of...
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Big Ten, Pac-10 challenge overdue?

Cory Schouten
July 7, 2008
Comments(4)
The idea of an annual Big Ten vs. Pac-10 college football showdown in a series of games—sources within each conference said—is long overdue. But until now the idea has never been put on the...
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New renderings of Allen Plaza

Cory Schouten
July 7, 2008
Comments(48)
Check out the latest renderings for the revamped Jefferson Plaza, which soon will be known as Allen Plaza. Local favorite Scotty's...
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  1. Apologies for the wall of text. I promise I had this nicely formatted in paragraphs in Notepad before pasting here.

  2. I believe that is incorrect Sir, the people's tax-dollars are NOT paying for the companies investment. Without the tax-break the company would be paying an ADDITIONAL $11.1 million in taxes ON TOP of their $22.5 Million investment (Building + IT), for a total of $33.6M or a 50% tax rate. Also, the article does not specify what the total taxes were BEFORE the break. Usually such a corporate tax-break is a 'discount' not a 100% wavier of tax obligations. For sake of example lets say the original taxes added up to $30M over 10 years. $12.5M, New Building $10.0M, IT infrastructure $30.0M, Total Taxes (Example Number) == $52.5M ININ's Cost - $1.8M /10 years, Tax Break (Building) - $0.75M /10 years, Tax Break (IT Infrastructure) - $8.6M /2 years, Tax Breaks (against Hiring Commitment: 430 new jobs /2 years) == 11.5M Possible tax breaks. ININ TOTAL COST: $41M Even if you assume a 100% break, change the '30.0M' to '11.5M' and you can see the Company will be paying a minimum of $22.5, out-of-pocket for their capital-investment - NOT the tax-payers. Also note, much of this money is being spent locally in Indiana and it is creating 430 jobs in your city. I admit I'm a little unclear which tax-breaks are allocated to exactly which expenses. Clearly this is all oversimplified but I think we have both made our points! :) Sorry for the long post.

  3. Clearly, there is a lack of a basic understanding of economics. It is not up to the company to decide what to pay its workers. If companies were able to decide how much to pay their workers then why wouldn't they pay everyone minimum wage? Why choose to pay $10 or $14 when they could pay $7? The answer is that companies DO NOT decide how much to pay workers. It is the market that dictates what a worker is worth and how much they should get paid. If Lowe's chooses to pay a call center worker $7 an hour it will not be able to hire anyone for the job, because all those people will work for someone else paying the market rate of $10-$14 an hour. This forces Lowes to pay its workers that much. Not because it wants to pay them that much out of the goodness of their heart, but because it has to pay them that much in order to stay competitive and attract good workers.

  4. GOOD DAY to you I am Mr Howell Henry, a Reputable, Legitimate & an accredited money Lender. I loan money out to individuals in need of financial assistance. Do you have a bad credit or are you in need of money to pay bills? i want to use this medium to inform you that i render reliable beneficiary assistance as I'll be glad to offer you a loan at 2% interest rate to reliable individuals. Services Rendered include: *Refinance *Home Improvement *Inventor Loans *Auto Loans *Debt Consolidation *Horse Loans *Line of Credit *Second Mortgage *Business Loans *Personal Loans *International Loans. Please write back if interested. Upon Response, you'll be mailed a Loan application form to fill. (No social security and no credit check, 100% Guaranteed!) I Look forward permitting me to be of service to you. You can contact me via e-mail howellhenryloanfirm@gmail.com Yours Sincerely MR Howell Henry(MD)

  5. It is sad to see these races not have a full attendance. The Indy Car races are so much more exciting than Nascar. It seems to me the commenters here are still a little upset with Tony George from a move he made 20 years ago. It was his decision to make, not yours. He lost his position over it. But I believe the problem in all pro sports is the escalating price of admission. In todays economy, people have to pay much more for food and gas. The average fan cannot attend many events anymore. It's gotten priced out of most peoples budgets.

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