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June 10, 2013
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Affiliates of Planned Parenthood in Indiana and Kentucky plan to merge on July 1 in an effort to pool resources, meet the challenges of the changing health care landscape, and potentially expand their reproductive-health services. The new not-for-profit is expected to be named Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky—or PPINK—and continue to operate the 28 existing health centers, with 26 of those in Indiana. Three of those Indiana centers perform abortions, but the Kentucky centers do not. The group will be based in Indianapolis, and employ 190 people in its health centers and administrative office. Betty Cockrum, president and CEO of the Indiana organization, will serve in the same role for the merged group. Mergers are common among the Planned Parenthood affiliates, according to the organization. At one time, the national Planned Parenthood family had more than 200 affiliates; there are now just 73. PPIN merged multiple times to become a statewide affiliate in 2004.

Indiana University Health has agreed to sell its eight occupational health clinics to a California-based chain that specializes in Workers' Compensation cases. US HealthWorks Medical Group, which already operates nearly 200 clinics in 17 states, agreed in May to acquire the eight clinics from IU Health, the largest hospital system in Indiana. The deal is expected to close before July. Neither entity disclosed the purchase price. US HealthWorks has offered jobs to 126 of the clinics' 149 workers. IU Health, which will maintain a role in serving clinic patients, has offered positions to 20 of those not hired by US HealthWorks and is working to place the remaining workers. US HealthWorks has been expanding rapidly even as the number of workers' comp cases trends down nationally. US HealthWorks operates occupational health clinics in Elkhart, Goshen, Muncie and Warsaw.

Franciscan St. Francis Health will close two After-Hours Clinics on the south side of Indianapolis at month’s end. The hospital system offered no explanation for the closures. It noted that it will keep operating a third After-Hours Clinic in Mooresville, and also will maintain two other immediate care clinics in the southern suburbs of Indianapolis. The clinics that will close are in Beech Grove at 2030 Churchman Ave. and near Franciscan’s Indianapolis hospital at 7855 S. Emerson Ave.

The state of Indiana plans to spend $37 million more each year reimbursing health care providers who treat Medicaid patients, partially reversing a 5-percent rate cut the state adopted in 2010 while struggling through the impacts of the national recession. A spokeswoman for Gov. Mike Pence said the increase would amount to 2 percent more for hospitals, nursing facilities, home health and immediate care providers. Cuts in how much the state Medicaid plan pays for dental, vision, medical transportation and other areas will be fully restored. The Legislature paid for the increased rates in their recently passed, $30 billion biennial budget.

Marian University in Indianapolis has announced it has reached its limit of 162 students for the incoming class of its new College of Osteopathic Medicine. School officials said they have received tuition deposits from 162 applicants. They say those students can still pursue their education elsewhere, but the school has a waiting list. They said they are confident they can fill any vacancies that arise.

The Indiana Blood Center is streamlining its blood mobile operations, closing a donor center and taking other cost-cutting measures in response to shrinking revenue from hospitals. The not-for-profit blood center announced June 4 that demand from hospitals has fallen 24 percent over the past year. That is forcing it to take steps that also include freezing management salaries, eliminating 45 positions, and discontinuing a therapeutic phlebotomy program. The blood center supplies more than 60 Indiana hospitals. It is funded by fees it charges those facilities to recruit donors and collect, test, process, label, store and distribute blood.

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  1. Cramer agrees...says don't buy it and sell it if you own it! Their "pay to play" cost is this issue. As long as they charge customers, they never will attain the critical mass needed to be a successful on company...Jim Cramer quote.

  2. My responses to some of the comments would include the following: 1. Our offer which included the forgiveness of debt (this is an immediate forgiveness and is not "spread over many years")represents debt that due to a reduction of interest rates in the economy arguably represents consideration together with the cash component of our offer that exceeds the $2.1 million apparently offered by another party. 2. The previous $2.1 million cash offer that was turned down by the CRC would have netted the CRC substantially less than $2.1 million. As a result even in hindsight the CRC was wise in turning down that offer. 3. With regard to "concerned Carmelite's" discussion of the previous financing Pedcor gave up $16.5 million in City debt in addition to the conveyance of the garage (appraised at $13 million)in exchange for the $22.5 million cash and debt obligations. The local media never discussed the $16.5 million in debt that we gave up which would show that we gave $29.5 million in value for the $23.5 million. 4.Pedcor would have been much happier if Brian was still operating his Deli and only made this offer as we believe that we can redevelop the building into something that will be better for the City and City Center where both Pedcor the citizens of Carmel have a large investment. Bruce Cordingley, President, Pedcor

  3. I've been looking for news on Corner Bakery, too, but there doesn't seem to be any info out there. I prefer them over Panera and Paradise so can't wait to see where they'll be!

  4. WGN actually is two channels: 1. WGN Chicago, seen only in Chicago (and parts of Canada) - this station is one of the flagship CW affiliates. 2. WGN America - a nationwide cable channel that doesn't carry any CW programming, and doesn't have local affiliates. (In addition, as WGN is owned by Tribune, just like WTTV, WTTK, and WXIN, I can't imagine they would do anything to help WISH.) In Indianapolis, CW programming is already seen on WTTV 4 and WTTK 29, and when CBS takes over those stations' main channels, the CW will move to a sub channel, such as 4.2 or 4.3 and 29.2 or 29.3. TBS is only a cable channel these days and does not affiliate with local stations. WISH could move the MyNetwork affiliation from WNDY 23 to WISH 8, but I am beginning to think they may prefer to put together their own lineup of syndicated programming instead. While much of it would be "reruns" from broadcast or cable, that's pretty much what the MyNetwork does these days anyway. So since WISH has the choice, they may want to customize their lineup by choosing programs that they feel will garner better ratings in this market.

  5. The Pedcor debt is from the CRC paying ~$23M for the Pedcor's parking garage at City Center that is apprased at $13M. Why did we pay over the top money for a private businesses parking? What did we get out of it? Pedcor got free parking for their apartment and business tenants. Pedcor now gets another building for free that taxpayers have ~$3M tied up in. This is NOT a win win for taxpayers. It is just a win for Pedcor who contributes heavily to the Friends of Jim Brainard. The campaign reports are on the Hamilton County website. http://www2.hamiltoncounty.in.gov/publicdocs/Campaign%20Finance%20Images/defaultfiles.asp?ARG1=Campaign Finance Images&ARG2=/Brainard, Jim

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