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DINING: Eatery adds to Library lunch options

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Dining - A&E

OK, I’ll admit it. When a local restaurant is in an underserved area—especially when it takes over the shell of another defunct restaurant whose emptiness brought down the energy of the neighborhood—I root for it.

So when Panorama Grill (901 N. Pennsylvania St., 423-3423) opened in the former Urban Element spot near the Central Library, I was hoping for more than a “good-enough” dining option when I need time away from the book stacks across the street.

What I found, though, was just a good-enough option when I need time away from book stacks across the street.
 

ae-panorama-dining15col.jpg Panorama Grill serves standard Mediterranean fare, including falafel. (IBJ Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

The most distinct thing about Panorama is the variety of seating in its single dining room. There are high tables in the middle, standard tables along the windows, and seats you sink into along the wall. (Good luck rising out of these if you’ve had a hearty lunch.)

The menu focuses on Mediterranean standards, but on our visit the lunch special was a Chicken Philly. There’s something to be said for variety, I suppose, but highlighting a non-Mediterranean item—and the presence of cheeseburgers and BLTs on the menu—smacked of a lack of confidence in the restaurant’s namesake fare.

These American options were not for

us. We opened with a Hummus appetizer ($5.95)—a mild, unmemorable version of the standard sesame seed/garlic/lemon juice puree served with a minimum of pita points. The Falafel sandwich ($6.95) came stuffed with a good number of chickpea balls packed into a pita with tomatoes, onion, parsley and tahini. They were crisp on the outside almost to the point of being overdone, but decent enough. The Gyro ($7.95) came with lukewarm rotisserie beef, a miserly amount of lettuce, onion and feta, and watery tzatziki sauce.

The central feature in the Chawarma entrée ($13.95) presented an acceptable array of tastes because it veered away from the all-too-common dryness of the dish. But the beef was a diamond in the rough compared to out-of-the-box-flavored rice and green beans. A bowl of Lentil soup was little more than just a side.

We would have tried some baklava or another housemade dessert, but five minutes after ordering it our waitress said the kitchen was suddenly busy with a party of six that just entered. Would we mind waiting another 10 minutes? Sorry, but the meter was running. And, besides, we were there first.•

–Lou Harry

__________

Second in a month-long series of “Grill” restaurant reviews.

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  • More like Metro Detroit ...
    That's too bad ... growing up in the Metro Detroit area, I know Middle Eastern food. Garlic sauce has become elusive in the 14 years I have lived in Indiana. We stopped @ the Panorama after the Pride parade. Service was spotty and slow but I was so delighted to see garlic sauce on the menu (reminiscent of La Pita in Dearborn, MI) that I really didn't care. Serving fresh pita with the sauce would be a good touch. Living just a few blocks away, it's kind of a restaurant dead zone on the weekends. We plan to pay another visit tomorrow and I only hope it lives up to my previous expectations.
  • Hummus with Tahini not OF Tahini
    Hummus has tahini in it but the main ingredient is chickpeas.
  • Where's the Veggies?
    Had dinner there a couple weeks ago and they intentionally left out all the vegetables from my shawarma. When I asked the waitress why they weren't included she said that most people don't want the veggies and so they had stopped including them as a preemptive measure. It was like ordering a burger with fries and then being told that most people don't like fries so they saved me the trouble and didn't include them. Seems like they need to figure out how to run a restaurant.

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  1. I took Bruce's comments to highlight a glaring issue when it comes to a state's image, and therefore its overall branding. An example is Michigan vs. Indiana. Michigan has done an excellent job of following through on its branding strategy around "Pure Michigan", even down to the detail of the rest stops. Since a state's branding is often targeted to visitors, it makes sense that rest stops, being that point of first impression, should be significant. It is clear that Indiana doesn't care as much about the impression it gives visitors even though our branding as the Crossroads of America does place importance on travel. Bruce's point is quite logical and accurate.

  2. I appreciated the article. I guess I have become so accustomed to making my "pit stops" at places where I can ALSO get gasoline and something hot to eat, that I hardly even notice public rest stops anymore. That said, I do concur with the rationale that our rest stops (if we are to have them at all) can and should be both fiscally-responsible AND designed to make a positive impression about our state.

  3. I don't know about the rest of you but I only stop at these places for one reason, and it's not to picnic. I move trucks for dealers and have been to rest areas in most all 48 lower states. Some of ours need upgrading no doubt. Many states rest areas are much worse than ours. In the rest area on I-70 just past Richmond truckers have to hike about a quarter of a mile. When I stop I;m generally in a bit of a hurry. Convenience,not beauty, is a primary concern.

  4. Community Hospital is the only system to not have layoffs? That is not true. Because I was one of the people who was laid off from East. And all of the LPN's have been laid off. Just because their layoffs were not announced or done all together does not mean people did not lose their jobs. They cherry-picked people from departments one by one. But you add them all up and it's several hundred. And East has had a dramatic drop I in patient beds from 800 to around 125. I know because I worked there for 30 years.

  5. I have obtained my 6 gallon badge for my donation of A Positive blood. I'm sorry to hear that my donation was nothing but a profit center for the Indiana Blood Center.

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