IBJOpinion

Editorial unfairly portrayed schools

November 21, 2009
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IBJ Letters To The Editor

[The Nov. 9 editorial] was the most offensive, mean-spirited, inaccurate and biased piece of muckraking I’ve seen in 20 years as an IBJ reader. Does the author really believe the implicit message that all schools, administrators and boards are incompetent and evil? How else to interpret “voters fed up ... little patience … boneheaded and wasteful … high-salaried superintendents, opulent buildings ... not take tax dollars for granted ... willingness to be fiscally responsible ... making fewer threats ... trim fat ... made some poor financial decisions ... wants a bailout?”

We all want to see schools make wise financial decisions based upon costs and benefits, deliver improved and measurable results, exhibit transparency, embrace accountability, innovate, benchmark and employ best practices.

I encourage IBJ to dedicate its journalists’ time to covering the specific steps taken (or not) by local schools, the state and the teaching profession to improve education. Demonizing schools in a broad-brush fashion helps no one.

____________

Tom Kapostasy

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  1. As I understand it, the idea is to offer police to live in high risk areas in exchange for a housing benefit/subsidy of some kind. This fact means there is a choice for the officer(s) to take the offer and receive the benefit. In terms of mandating living in a community, it is entirely reasonable for employers to mandate public safety officials live in their community. Again, the public safety official has a choice, to live in the area or to take another job.

  2. The free market will seek its own level. If Employers cannot hire a retain good employees in Marion Co they will leave and set up shop in adjacent county. Marion Co already suffers from businesses leaving I would think this would encourage more of the same.

  3. We gotta stop this Senior crime. Perhaps long jail terms for these old boozers is in order. There are times these days (more rather than less) when this state makes me sick.

  4. One option is to redistribute the payroll tax already collected by the State. A greater share could be allocated to the county of the workplace location as opposed to the county of residency. Not a new tax, just re-allocate what is currently collected.

  5. Have to agree with Mal Burgess. The biggest problem is massive family breakdown in these neighborhoods. While there are a lot of similiarities, there is a MASSIVE difference between 46218 and 46219. 46219 is diluted by some stable areas, and that's probably where the officers live. Incentivizing is fine, but don't criticize officers for choosing not to live in these neighbor hoods. They have to have a break from what is arguably one of the highest stress job in the land. And you'll have to give me hard evidence that putting officers there is going to make a significant difference. Solid family units, responsible fathers, siblings with the same fathers, engaged parents, commitment to education, respect for the rule of law and the importance of work/a job. If the families and the schools (and society) will support these, THEN we can make a difference.

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