IBJNews

Environmental group against Mounds reservoir plan

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Another environmental group has come out against plans for a new seven-mile long reservoir in central Indiana, citing concerns about damage to Mounds State Park.

A regional chapter of the Audubon Society says the proposed Mounds Lake Reservoir would hurt the natural environment near Anderson by flooding at least one-third of the park known for earthworks built by American Indians more than 2,000 years ago.

Chapter president Sarah McKillip told The Herald Bulletin that the reservoir would destroy the park's nature preserve and submerge hiking trails along the White River.

An environmental study is being conducted for the 2,100-acre lake that's estimated to cost about $400 million. The state has provided a $600,000 grant to study the project.

Project advocates say the reservoir could boost tourism and help relieve the impact of floods and drought in the area.

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Fen is irreplaceable
    The Mounds Fen Nature Preserve is irreplaceable if destroyed. It is a natural gem that cannot be replicated by man. We need to save it for future generations.
  • Not the same thing
    Lakes and mounds are not in fact the same. One is a hole filled with water. The other is a hill made of dirt.
  • Build the Reservoir
    This is a win-win for the people of central Indiana---What beats a lake to provide home sites, recreation, walking paths, lovely landscaping along with the Mounds which will see far more visitors than before! Will help the economy also!
  • IndianMounds was ManMade
    I agree...the Indian mounds was man made by the Indians...so why can't we make a reservoir that is man made? Seems like the same thing.
    • For Anderson
      The proposed reservoir would be a much needed boost for Anderson. Hope to see it happen.
    • the good of the many outweighs the good of the few
      This sounds like a lot of gibberish. Mounds area is an area of Indian mounds, keep them safe, but trails on the White River, how many people can use them or do use them. A reservoir would expand the trails with nature trails around it, parks, boating, fishing, wildlife, birds, animals, etc. The economic and social need is great.

      Post a comment to this story

      COMMENTS POLICY
      We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
       
      You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
       
      Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
       
      No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
       
      We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
       

      Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

      Sponsored by
      ADVERTISEMENT

      facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

      Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
      Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
       
      Subscribe to IBJ
      1. How much you wanna bet, that 70% of the jobs created there (after construction) are minimum wage? And Harvey is correct, the vast majority of residents in this project will drive to their jobs, and to think otherwise, is like Harvey says, a pipe dream. Someone working at a restaurant or retail store will not be able to afford living there. What ever happened to people who wanted to build buildings, paying for it themselves? Not a fan of these tax deals.

      2. Uh, no GeorgeP. The project is supposed to bring on 1,000 jobs and those people along with the people that will be living in the new residential will be driving to their jobs. The walkable stuff is a pipe dream. Besides, walkable is defined as having all daily necessities within 1/2 mile. That's not the case here. Never will be.

      3. Brad is on to something there. The merger of the Formula E and IndyCar Series would give IndyCar access to International markets and Formula E access the Indianapolis 500, not to mention some other events in the USA. Maybe after 2016 but before the new Dallara is rolled out for 2018. This give IndyCar two more seasons to run the DW12 and Formula E to get charged up, pun intended. Then shock the racing world, pun intended, but making the 101st Indianapolis 500 a stellar, groundbreaking event: The first all-electric Indy 500, and use that platform to promote the future of the sport.

      4. No, HarveyF, the exact opposite. Greater density and closeness to retail and everyday necessities reduces traffic. When one has to drive miles for necessities, all those cars are on the roads for many miles. When reasonable density is built, low rise in this case, in the middle of a thriving retail area, one has to drive far less, actually reducing the number of cars on the road.

      5. The Indy Star announced today the appointment of a new Beverage Reporter! So instead of insightful reports on Indy pro sports and Indiana college teams, you now get to read stories about the 432nd new brewery open or some obscure Hoosier winery winning a county fair blue ribbon. Yep, that's the coverage we Star readers crave. Not.

      ADVERTISEMENT