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Glick Fund issues $2.5 million in program grants

 IBJ Staff
November 14, 2012
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The Glick Fund has doled out more than $2.5 million in new grants to 37 Indianapolis-area organizations, the Central Indiana Community Foundation, which manages the fund, announced Wednesday.

Awards ranged from $5,000 to $325,000 and will pay for programs and services in arts, education, human needs, self-sufficiency and job training.

The donations are part of a new direction the Glick Fund set in 2010 for its charitable efforts. Philanthropists Eugene and Marilyn Glick changed their strategy to focus more on services rather than building projects, an area that received $62 million in grants from the couple and their foundations late last decade. Marilyn Glick died earlier this year.

The largest single award from the most recent round of Glick grants was $325,000 to Providence Christo Rey High School. The private, college-preparatory school west of downtown Indianapolis will use the money to pay for scholarships for low-income students and transportation to work-study programs.

The Glick Fund has given out more than $45 million since it was founded in 1998.

The latest Glick Fund grants are as follows:

Arts and creative expression grants

— Art With A Heart, $50,000;

— Asante Children’s Theatre, $5,000;

— Athenaeum Turners School of Performing Arts, $12,000;

— Big Car, $50,000;

— The Cabaret at the Columbia Club, $20,000;

— Dance Kaleidoscope, $15,000;

— Indiana Repertory Theatre, $75,000;

— Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, $40,000;

— The New Harmony Project, $5,000;

— VSA Indiana, $25,000;

Education grants

— Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana, $250,000;

— Christamore House, $50,000;

— Day Nursery, $75,000;

— The Fortune Academy, $10,000;

— Indianapolis Public Schools, $175,560;

— KIPP Indianapolis College Preparatory, $10,000;

— The Mind Trust, $25,000;

— Providence Cristo Rey High School, $325,000;

— School on Wheels, $50,000;

— Starfish Initiative, $20,000;

— Summer Advantage USA, $10,000;

— United Way of Central Indiana, $292,113;

Need programs

— CICOA Aging & In-Home Solutions, $50,000;

— Connect2Help, $75,000;

— Dayspring, $110,000;

— John H. Boner Community Center, $49,266;

— John P. Crain House, $60,000;

— Joy’s House, $100,000;

— Miracle Place, $40,000;

— Second Helpings, $65,000;

Self-sufficiency, job skills and training grants

— Coburn Place Safe Haven, $75,000;

— Damar Services, $25,000;

— Forest Manor Multi-Service Center, $75,000;

— Girls Inc. of Greater Indianapolis, $200,000;

— Growing Places Indy, $5,000;

— Noble of Indiana, $60,000;

— Trusted Mentors, $85,000;

 

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  • Fantastic!
    What a generous company. Thank you David B. for your company's generosity and to your support of Child Advocates.

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