IBJNews

Gregg, Pence ratchet up fundraising in race

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Republican Mike Pence and Democrat John Gregg are heading into the key stretch of the Indiana governor's race with strong bankrolls.

Pence had $5.5 million in the bank as of July 1 and Gregg had $3 million. The campaigns released their fundraising tallies for the three-month stretch from April through June on Monday.

Gregg began closing a massive fundraising gap by raising $1.8 million in the last quarter. Indiana Democrats say his choice of state Senate Minority Leader Vi Simpson as a running mate has helped with fundraising.

Pence reported raising $3 million in the same time span. One-third of that came in a single donation from the Republican Governor's Association.

Money will play a greater role in the months ahead as the campaigns begin spending more on campaign commercials.

Pence received $1 million from the RGA Ohio Political Action Committee, which is a super PAC funded by the Republican Governors Association.

Anthony Moravec, who owns a pharmaceutical company and Zaharakos Ice Cream Parlor in Columbus, gave him $100,000. So did Crown Point billionaire Dean White.

Angie’s List CEO Bill Oesterle gave $50,000.

BrightPoint Inc. gave $20,000 through its political action committee, Brightpoint Eclipse. J. Mark Howell, president of Americas at BrightPoint, gave $10,000.

Other local executives giving $10,000 or more were Samuel Sato, president of the Finish Line brand; James Dora, CEO of Indianapolis-based General Hotels Corp.; Dane A. Miller, retired founder of Biomet; Mike Weaver, CEO of Weaver Popcorn Co. The Wellpoint PAC also gave $10,000.

Several local businessmen gave $5,000. They were venture capitalist John Ackerman, Michael Petrie, president of P/R Mortgage and Investment Corp., and John Kite, CEO of Kite Realty Group Trust.

Gregg received $250,000 from I-PACE, the political action committee of the Indiana State Teachers Association. Some of his largest union donors were Springfield, Ill.-based Midwest Regional Laborers Political League, which gave $200,000 and the United Auto Workers Region 3, which gave $50,000.

Herb Simon, co-founder of Simon Property Group and owner of the Indiana Pacers, gave $15,000. His nieces Deborah Simon and Cindy Simon Skjodt each gave $50,000.

David B. Becker, entrepreneur and founder of First Internet Bank, gave $10,000, as did Indianapolis arts philanthropist Ann Stack and the Beer Industry PAC, an arm of the beer wholesaler’s group, Indiana Beverage Alliance.  

 

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Angie's List Subscriber Upset
    Bill Oesterle can contribute to whomever he wishes, but if this is coming from his earnings from Angie's list, I sure don't want my subscription money to Angie's list helping to support a candidate who I find objectionable. This may sound petty, but since the Citizen's United decision, I have become increasingly aware of how the money I spend goes to support people who I choose not to support. A good example is when I buy Dixie Cups, I am supporting the Koch brothers. This is, I believe, a very good reason for public financing of political campaigns.
  • Angie's List Subscriber Upset
    Bill Oesterle can contribute to whomever he wishes, but if this is coming from his earnings from Angie's list, I sure don't want my subscription money to Angie's list helping to support a candidate who I find objectionable. This may sound petty, but since the Citizen's United decision, I have become increasingly aware of how the money I spend goes to support people who I choose not to support. A good example is when I buy Dixie Cups, I am supporting the Koch brothers. This is, I believe, a very good reason for public financing of political campaigns.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  2. If you only knew....

  3. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

  4. The facts contained in your post make your position so much more credible than those based on sheer emotion. Thanks for enlightening us.

  5. Please consider a couple of economic realities: First, retail is more consolidated now than it was when malls like this were built. There used to be many department stores. Now, in essence, there is one--Macy's. Right off, you've eliminated the need for multiple anchor stores in malls. And in-line retailers have consolidated or folded or have stopped building new stores because so much of their business is now online. The Limited, for example, Next, malls are closing all over the country, even some of the former gems are now derelict.Times change. And finally, as the income level of any particular area declines, so do the retail offerings. Sad, but true.

ADVERTISEMENT