IBJNews

IBJ wins national journalism awards

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

IBJ won eight awards at the Alliance of Area Business Publications’ summer conference Saturday in Indianapolis.

Judges from the University of Missouri's School of Journalism evaluated 555 entries from 47 publications, including papers in Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. All told, 107 gold, silver or bronze awards were handed out.

IBJ won gold awards in three categories, including best daily e-mail.

In honoring IBJ Daily, judges wrote that it “provides a wealth of business news and information in a tidy summary that is easily digestible.”

Other IBJ gold medal winners:

• Best staff-generated blog for The Score, written by sports-business reporter Anthony Schoettle.

• Best newspaper front page for a collection of entries submitted by the IBJ art department under the guidance of former Creative Director Jo Hohlbein.

IBJ's other prizes:

• Silver. Best investigative reporting for real estate reporter Cory Schouten’s “Simon Says, City Does” story examining the relationship between the city and Simon family.

• Silver. Best coverage of local breaking news for health care reporter J.K. Wall’s online and print coverage of Eli Lilly and Co.’s plans to lay off 5,500 employees and restructure the company.

• Silver. Best recurring feature for Managing Editor Greg Andrews’ weekly Behind the News column.

• Silver. Best website for IBJ.com.
 
• Bronze. Best feature layout for a Construction/Design/Engineering Focus cover.

Los Angeles-based AABP is a national organization representing 64 independent magazine and newspaper members in the United States, Canada and Australia.

Also this month, IBJ was honored by Editor and Publisher magazine with one of its coveted EPpy interactive awards. IBJ.com was named best newspaper-affiliated website with fewer than 1 million unique monthly visitors. The site also was a finalist in the best business website category. The EPpys were handed out June 17 in Las Vegas.
 

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Journalism awards
    IBJ's journalism awards are very well deserved IMHO. I receive comparable daily business journal emails from a handful of cities. IBJ's layout and article summaries are the best. And I really cannot remember any of the other publications doing the kind of indepth reporting that the IBJ regularly does for its on-line readers. Congratulations.

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. You are correct that Obamacare requires health insurance policies to include richer benefits and protects patients who get sick. That's what I was getting at when I wrote above, "That’s because Obamacare required insurers to take all customers, regardless of their health status, and also established a floor on how skimpy the benefits paid for by health plans could be." I think it's vital to know exactly how much the essential health benefits are costing over previous policies. Unless we know the cost of the law, we can't do a cost-benefit analysis. Taxes were raised in order to offset a 31% rise in health insurance premiums, an increase that paid for richer benefits. Are those richer benefits worth that much or not? That's the question we need to answer. This study at least gets us started on doing so.

  2. *5 employees per floor. Either way its ridiculous.

  3. Jim, thanks for always ready my stuff and providing thoughtful comments. I am sure that someone more familiar with research design and methods could take issue with Kowalski's study. I thought it was of considerable value, however, because so far we have been crediting Obamacare for all the gains in coverage and all price increases, neither of which is entirely fair. This is at least a rigorous attempt to sort things out. Maybe a quixotic attempt, but it's one of the first ones I've seen try to do it in a sophisticated way.

  4. In addition to rewriting history, the paper (or at least your summary of it) ignores that Obamacare policies now must provide "essential health benefits". Maybe Mr Wall has always been insured in a group plan but even group plans had holes you could drive a truck through, like the Colts defensive line last night. Individual plans were even worse. So, when you come up with a study that factors that in, let me know, otherwise the numbers are garbage.

  5. You guys are absolutely right: Cummins should build a massive 80-story high rise, and give each employee 5 floors. Or, I suppose they could always rent out the top floors if they wanted, since downtown office space is bursting at the seams (http://www.ibj.com/article?articleId=49481).

ADVERTISEMENT