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Indiana, IBM sue each other over welfare contract

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Disagreements between the state of Indiana and IBM Corp. over a failed welfare-administration contract have escalated into a full-blown legal battle.

The two parties sued each other Thursday over the technology giant's canceled 10-year, $1.34 billion contract to automate the state's intake for food stamps, Medicaid and other benefits.

Both lawsuits were filed in Marion County Superior Court.

In its lawsuit, the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration is seeking to recover the $437.6 million it paid IBM through Jan. 31, plus the costs of any third-party lawsuits, federal penalties, and state employee overtime that it incurs as a result of its association with the Armonk, N.Y.-based company.

The state is seeking triple damages, or more than $1.3 billion, as it's entitled to do under state law.

The state agency wants IBM's request for $83.4 million in penalties called for in the contract thrown out as unenforceable under state law.

IBM says the state owes it nearly $53 million in fees and equipment expenses, plus interest, under the 2006 contract. Gov. Mitch Daniels cancelled the contract in October because he wasn't satisfied with its results.

On Wednesday, Anne Murphy, the head of the Indiana agency, told the State Budget Committee that the state had rejected some invoices submitted by IBM and had asked for the return of undisclosed amount of money.

"IBM's failure to help our most vulnerable Hoosiers and fix Indiana's welfare system set us back in time and money, for which we'd like compensation," Murphy said in a prepared statement Thursday.

"Our new contractors are achieving far better results than either Indiana's previous system or the system IBM attempted to install. That is evidence the job of repair and reform could have been done much better," she said.

Murphy told the Budget Committee that IBM had collected $2.64 million in disengagement costs from the state and federal government from December through March. She said she expected those payments to IBM, for items such as equipment and technology, would continue through the end of June.

IBM issued a statement acknowledging the contract gave the state the right to cancel but also requires it to reimburse IBM for deferred fees and equipment costs.

"The State threatens to undermine the integrity of a public procurement process under which thousands of private companies conduct business with Indiana expecting and depending on the State to fulfill its contractual commitments," the company said.

After IBM's dismissal, FSSA rolled out what it has called a "hybrid" welfare intake solution that adds more local case workers and face-to-face contact to supplement the call centers, document imaging and other technology that IBM introduced but left clients, their advocates and lawmakers complaining of improperly denied benefits, lost documents, dropped calls and other problems.

Murphy said the hybrid solution is working so well in 10 southwestern Indiana counties that she wants to expand it to the remaining 49 counties where welfare intake was automated by the end of the year and to the state's remaining 33 counties next year.

However, IBM said the hybrid's use of the company's technology, infrastructure, applications, automated processes and systems underscored "IBM's contributions to an improved welfare eligibility system in the State."

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  • Indiana knew
    I worked for a MCO when all this was happening. Indiana was aware of the lawsuits facing IBM over the same issues.
  • No value - everyone loses
    This is a classic example of where contracting parties, despite having a contract, cant agree on whether the contract is for a result or outcome, or for time and materials. In a dispute like this no body wins.
    Jenny Sutton - Author: Extract Value from Consultants
  • Same Old Story
    The State of Indiana was responsible for the success of this project, and their history of mismanagement of IT projects is so vast, it would be difficult to place all the blame on the vendor. The same thing has been going on for years with the much-vaunted new child welfare system, which remains some kind of hybrid mess while management changes direction over and over, wasting money right and left. That project hasn't received the negative publicity because it doesn't involve money being paid to the public. Just the well-being of the state's children.
  • What A Mess
    Accountability?

    Is it true the former FSSA leader that created this mess got a pay raise and a promotion?

    Wonder if his former private sector employer is still being paid millions for being a part of the IBM team.

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  1. Of what value is selling alcoholic beverages to State Fair patrons when there are many families with children attending. Is this the message we want to give children attending and participating in the Fair, another venue with alooholic consumption onsite. Is this to promote beer and wine production in the state which are great for the breweries and wineries, but where does this end up 10-15 years from now, lots more drinkers for the alcoholic contents. If these drinks are so important, why not remove the alcohol content and the flavor and drink itself similar to soft drinks would be the novelty, not the alcoholic content and its affects on the drinker. There is no social or material benefit from drinking alcoholic beverages, mostly people want to get slightly or highly drunk.

  2. I did;nt know anyone in Indiana could count- WHY did they NOT SAY just HOW this would be enforced? Because it WON;T! NOW- with that said- BIG BROTHER is ALIVE in this Article-why take any comment if it won't appease YOU PEOPLE- that's NOT American- with EVERYTHING you indicated is NOT said-I can see WHY it say's o Comments- YOU are COMMIES- BIG BROTHER and most likely- voted for Obama!

  3. In Europe there are schools for hairdressing but you don't get a license afterwards but you are required to assist in turkey and Italy its 7 years in japan it's 10 years England 2 so these people who assist know how to do hair their not just anybody and if your an owner and you hire someone with no experience then ur an idiot I've known stylist from different countries with no license but they are professional clean and safe they have no license but they have experience a license doesn't mean anything look at all the bad hairdressers in the world that have fried peoples hair okay but they have a license doesn't make them a professional at their job I think they should get rid of it because stateboard robs stylist and owners and they fine you for the dumbest f***ing things oh ur license isn't displayed 100$ oh ur wearing open toe shoes fine, oh there's ONE HAIR IN UR BRUSH that's a fine it's like really? So I think they need to go or ease up on their regulations because their too strict

  4. Exciting times in Carmel.

  5. Twenty years ago when we moved to Indy I was a stay at home mom and knew not very many people.WIBC was my family and friends for the most part. It was informative, civil, and humerous with Dave the KING. Terri, Jeff, Stever, Big Joe, Matt, Pat and Crumie. I loved them all, and they seemed to love each other. I didn't mind Greg Garrison, but I was not a Rush fan. NOW I can't stand Chicks and all their giggly opinions. Tony Katz is to abrasive that early in the morning(or really any time). I will tune in on Saturday morning for the usual fun and priceless information from Pat and Crumie, mornings it will be 90.1

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