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Kittle's Furniture shuffles executives, names new CEO

IBJ Staff
January 12, 2010
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Indianapolis-based Kittle’s Furniture announced changes in its leadership Tuesday that will result in company owner and chairman of the board Jim Kittle Jr. becoming less involved in daily operations.

John Durkott has been promoted from CEO to vice chairman of the board while Eric Easter, formerly president and chief operating officer, assumes the CEO title.

Durkott, a 36-year veteran of Kittle’s, will continue to provide financial oversight, as well as serve on the company’s board and executive committee.

Easter, who rejoined Kittle’s in June 2009 after a six-year stint with Thomasville Furniture Inc., assumes responsibility for day-to-day operations of the company. Easter has more than 30 years of experience in the furniture industry.

Kittle, meanwhile, will focus more on real estate, vendor relationships and general oversight of the company, he said in a prepared statement.

“We are very fortunate to be in a position to make this transition, which will only strengthen our operations and position Kittle’s Furniture for continuing growth and a profitable future,” he said.

Kittle’s, founded in 1932, is one of the largest furniture-store chains in the Midwest. It operates 14 stores in Indiana and Ohio.
  
 

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