IBJNews

Pennsylvania, NCAA seek time for talks in Penn State suit

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Lawyers for the NCAA, the governor of Pennsylvania and others asked a judge to give them a month to work on a possible settlement of a lawsuit over the penalties Penn State University is paying for mishandling the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

The sides filed a joint motion Wednesday in Harrisburg federal court that said another month would give them a "meaningful opportunity" to resolve the lawsuit.

"The parties agree that this postponement may help secure the just and efficient resolution of this proceeding," they wrote.

The Indianapolis-based NCAA sued Gov. Tom Corbett, state Treasurer Rob McCord and two other state officials over a 2013 law that requires a $60 million penalty being paid by Penn State to stay within Pennsylvania. Penn State said Thursday that so far it has set aside the first two payments, a total of $24 million.

McCord spokesman Gary Tuma declined to say whether there was a specific reason to think a settlement could occur. The NCAA, the auditor general's office and Corbett's general counsel's office all declined comment.

A consent decree between the NCAA and Penn State included the $60 million fine, a figure designed to match an average year's football revenue at the university. The money, paid over five years, is earmarked for programs to prevent child sexual abuse and to help its victims.

A month after Corbett signed the law requiring the money remain in Pennsylvania, the NCAA challenged it in federal court, saying it violated the U.S. Constitution.

If a judge grants the request, it would postpone pending proceedings that would outline how the lawsuit will go forward — the filing of a case management plan and an Aug. 14 case management conference.

Sandusky, retired as Penn State's longtime defensive football coach, was convicted in 2012 of 45 counts of child sexual abuse and is serving a lengthy state prison sentence.

A separate state court lawsuit seeking to enforce the Pennsylvania law, known as the Institution of Higher Education Monetary Penalty Endowment Act, is expected to go to trial early next year.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
ADVERTISEMENT