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Planned Parenthood says donors alone can't sustain clinics

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Donors from far and wide are sending money to Planned Parenthood of Indiana, but the organization doesn’t expect the giving to last.

“What we’ve seen in the last month is astonishing, and it can’t be sustained,” CEO Betty Cockrum said Thursday morning.

The outpouring is in response to a new Indiana law that says abortion providers can’t receive Medicaid reimbursement. That eliminates about $1.4 million, or 9 percent, of Planned Parenthood’s $15 million operating budget.

After receiving more than $100,000 in donations, Planned Parenthood said on Thursday it would continue providing services such as pap tests, sexually transmitted disease testing and birth control to Medicaid patients through June 15.

Planned Parenthood is hoping a federal judge will block the law. The organization doesn’t have a back-up plan because the Medicaid-funding picture is so complicated, spokeswoman Kate Shepherd said.

The impact on patients varies across Planned Parenthood’s 28 clinics. Midtown Indianapolis at 3750 N. Meridian St. sees the highest portion of Medicaid patients, at 24 percent.

At other clinics, such as Castleton and Richmond, the portion of Medicaid patients is less than 6 percent. Several locations serve a high portion of low-income patients, but they’re covered under federal grant programs, not Medicaid reimbursement.

Planned Parenthood performs abortions at four sites: Merrillville, Bloomington, Lafayette and in Indianapolis at 86th Street and Georgetown Road.

Existing federal law means that none of those clinics can use federal funds for their general operations. Medicaid-eligible patients may go to those clinics for abortions, but again, they can’t use federal money to pay for it.

Planned Parenthood performed 5,580 abortions in the 2010 fiscal year ended June 30. At a cost of $300 to $500 each, abortions generate roughly $2 million a year. (Planned Parenthood said it does does not track revenue specifically from abortions.)

This isn’t the first time in recent years that Planned Parenthood of Indiana has lost a source of government revenue. Six clinics closed in 2009 after Indiana privatized the administration of federal family-planning grants, and the contractor changed the rules for distributing money, Shepherd said.  

The clinic closings, plus more aggressive protester activity and the 2010 general election prompted core donors to step up their support, Cockrum said. Planned Parenthood’s main annual fundraising event, “a Gathering of Goddesses and Gods,” raised record amounts the past two years, she said.

In the fiscal year ended June 30, contributions and private-sector grants doubled to more than $2 million, or 13 percent, of revenue. That was the same share as government contracts and grants.

The spike in private support last year was the result of bequests from long-time supporters, Cockrum said. For the most part, she said annual fundraising efforts net a little more than $1 million a year.

“Our fundraising, year-to-year, is very consistent,” she said.

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  • 180movie.com
    180movie.com
  • Punishing the child for the crime of the mother
    To IrvingtonGuy: what about keeping your/their hands off the baby's body?
  • Straw man
    The law doesn't stop abortions. it doesn't stop Planned Parenthood from performing abortions. It only follows the letter of existing law that prevents Medicaid money from being spent on abortions. If a woman wants rid of her unborn child, she needs to either drop $300-$500 of her own coin to delete her problem, get her baby daddy to cough up, or PP finds a donor to pay the price for her. Just not tax money. Taxpayer funded abortions are all that are stopped by this.
  • No this is the other side of the story
    Steve and Betty, Who is going to take care of these kids that are born to parents who don't want them or can't afford to take care of them. Don't say they should have used birth control because now they can't get it because PP has shut down. The parents will end up keeping them and possibly abusing them. The state comes in and takes them away and puts them into foster care where they stay the rest of their lives possibly being abused again. I think it is pretty short sighted to tell a woman what she can and can't do with her body. And before anyone goes off about me being a liberal, I'm a registered Republican and I believe in smaller government so this would include keeping their hands of mine and anyone else's body. May have to vote democratic next time to counter this extreme swing to the right our legislature has made.
    • Bad typing
      \/ I meant "non-compliance."
    • Hmmm
      So, on the one hand, PP takes government money with the official strings attached that the funds can't be used for state-sponsored abortions. But then it goes on to whine that there's no way to separate the finances of non-abortion work from abortions, because it's "complicated?" Sounds like a simple case of non-compiance to me.
      • planned parenthood
        Abortions should've have never been allowed this is simple murder nothing else got it people..it not only ruins a person's mind but takes a life..
      • bravo
        Great news to hear! There are plenty of other clinics that have (or will) stepped up to help these medicaid patients. PP has committed enough atrocities and needs to be shut down.
      • One sided
        That was clearly a one sided report. Lets try and get a little balance in the IBJ and talk to those not so favorable to planned parenthood. They are far from being an altruistic provider of serves to the poor.
        • The unborn
          are the victims. It seems that these babies should be worth more than $300-$500 to Planned Parenthood's Bottom line. So sad.

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