IBJNews

Severe weather shuts down business in metro area

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Commerce in the Indianapolis metro area ground to a halt Monday morning, as businesses and government offices stayed closed to help employees and customers avoid dangerous winter weather.

The closings included state and local government, corporate headquarters, factories and retail stores.

Ball State University economist Mike Hicks predicted losses in the tens of millions of dollars from the cost of snow removal, the mobilization of extra manpower, and damages to property, especially if damage to homes is significant.

But the shutdown of travel and everyday transactions isn't permanent, so much of that business will be recouped later, Hicks noted.

“These sorts of closings are not uncommon, and this one is probably well-timed, coming as it does at the early part of the year,” he said.

Large companies including OneAmerica Financial Partners Inc., Eli Lilly and Co. and Rolls-Royce Corp. closed their downtown headquarters Monday.

Lilly spokesman Ed Sagabiel said essential employees reported to work, and drug production was not affected. Jet-engine maker Rolls-Royce canceled all shifts of factory work, spokesman George McLaren said. Honda Manufacturing of Indiana canceled the first shift at its Greensburg plant.

Several Simon-owned malls in the area closed for the day (Hamilton Town Center, Fashion Mall, Clay Terrace) or delayed their openings to 2 p.m. or later (Castleton Square, Circle Centre, Greenwood Park and Washington Square).

Fishers-based Forum Credit Union – the largest credit union in the area – closed all locations, and Old National Bank delayed opening until noon.

Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard urged businesses to stay closed Tuesday as well, because subzero temperatures are expected to continue.

Kroger, however, was doing its best to keep stores and regional operations going. Six stores in Indiana were closed or partly closed, spokesman John Elliott said. One of the stores that remained open, at 71st Street and Binford Boulevard, lost power Sunday and ran on a generator.

Distribution centers, the bakery and dairy were struggling to catch up on restocking after record sales Friday and Saturday. They were running about 24 hours behind, partly because Kroger gave employees the option to stay home for personal safety, Elliott said.

The storm was well-timed for the FedEx distribution hub at Indianapolis International Airport. The company does not sort packages on Sundays, so there were no FedEx flight cancellations on Sunday, during the height of the storm, Indianapolis Airport Authority spokesman Carlo Bertolini said.

“It's our understanding they plan a normal operation today,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. A Tilted Kilt at a water park themed hotel? Who planned that one? I guess the Dad's need something to do while the kids are on the water slides.

  2. Don't come down on the fair for offering drinks. This is a craft and certainly one that belongs in agriculture due to ingredients. And for those worrying about how much you can drink. I'm sure it's more to do with liability than anything else. They don't want people suing for being over served. If you want a buzz, do a little pre-drinking before you go.

  3. I don't drink but go into this "controlled area" so my friend can drink. They have their 3 drink limit and then I give my friend my 3 drink limit. How is the fair going to control this very likely situation????

  4. I feel the conditions of the alcohol sales are a bit heavy handed, but you need to realize this is the first year in quite some time that beer & wine will be sold at the fair. They're starting off slowly to get a gauge on how it will perform this year - I would assume if everything goes fine that they relax some of the limits in the next year or couple of years. That said, I think requiring the consumption of alcohol to only occur in the beer tent is a bit much. That is going to be an awkward situation for those with minors - "Honey, I'm getting a beer... Ok, sure go ahead... Alright see you in just a min- half an hour."

  5. This might be an effort on the part of the State Fair Board to manage the risk until they get a better feel for it. However, the blanket notion that alcohol should not be served at "family oriented" events is perhaps an oversimplification. and not too realistic. For 15 years, I was a volunteer at the Indianapolis Air Show, which was as family oriented an event as it gets. We sold beer donated by Monarch Beverage Company and served by licensed and trained employees of United Package Liquors who were unpaid volunteers. And where did that money go? To central Indiana children's charities, including Riley Hospital for Children! It's all about managing the risk.

ADVERTISEMENT