IBJNews

Shine comes off privatization for state projects

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Government leaders across Indiana are increasingly adopting former Gov. Mitch Daniels' approach to funding big projects, turning to outside sources to fund and operate them. But they're unlikely to see the huge windfalls that Indiana received in 2006 when Daniels leased the Indiana Toll Road for $3.8 billion.

Instead, investors in state projects are more likely to demand guaranteed fixed annual payments before providing money for the projects, The Times in Munster reported.

The shift reflects investors' desire to insulate themselves from the risk that revenue from the projects won't meet expectations, said Robert Poole, director of transportation policy at the Reason Foundation.

Poole said many public-private partnership projects "have gotten into trouble because projections were a little too rosy."

The new approach to privatization has forced officials in Indiana and Illinois to rethink their funding plans for the 47-mile Illiana Expressway.

In early 2013, the states had hoped that investors might pay the entire cost of the toll road in exchange for keeping the toll proceeds. But that idea was dropped, and the states are now offering private investment teams competing for the project annual payments throughout the 35-year lease.

If toll collections fall short of those fixed payments, the states will have to make up the difference.

Indiana and Illinois also estimate they may have to pay a combined $270 million in cash to investors in the form of milestone payments in 2018 and 2019 once the road is built.

Illinois Department of Transportation Secretary Ann Schneider acknowledged the risk to the states but said Indiana and Illinois will get "the upside of that risk."

She noted that relying on private investors means the road will be built and open much sooner than if only state funds were used. That will get heavy trucks off local roads sooner and save the states maintenance costs for roads that now take a beating.

"It's a double bang for the buck," Schneider said.

Poole said public-private partnerships still hold great promise for rebuilding the United States' crumbling infrastructure, but he acknowledged that the shift in bargaining power means some safeguards are needed. One suggestion is to cap how much future revenue states can dedicate to fixed annual payments.

And he urged residents to question officials when agreements are being discussed.

"People should always take what elected officials of any kind say with a grain of salt," Poole said. "They should be asking who's really responsible for what in the future, and who is taking on the risk, and how much are they taking on?"

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Which just goes to show
    That public-private partnership is a bad model for governance in nearly every case.
  • Where's the beef?
    This model of "the private sector handles these issues efficiently and competitively" is quickly evolving into the worst kind of crony capitalism. These firms are not following the dictates of markets, but the wish lists of pols with donors and lobbyists to satisfy. And now they don't even try to give the illusion of risk-taking; they are demanding we set up an annuity for their "expertise", which will guarantee them a defined profit.
  • Shine comes off
    ". . . he won't be around when the bill has to be paid." What governor (or any other politician) is around when the bill has to be paid?
    • Repeat After Me..No Taxes
      It's my favorite line from our Indiana politicians. "I can do all these things for you and there will still be no new taxes." Does this mean we'll generate new economic development and it won't cost anybody? Here's my question folks, has anybody offered you a free trip to Europe this week? Or a new car? For free? If that hasn't happened to you in the past year, then why do we continue to believe these charlatans who say we'll will never have to pay the bill for road improvements, kindergarten, higher education? As far as I'm concerned, we're foolish to trust in any deals that Gov. Pence makes, because he won't be around when the bill has to be paid.
      • privatization for state projects
        "People should always take what elected officials . . . say with a grain of salt, . . ." A grain? How about a heaping tablespoon?

      Post a comment to this story

      COMMENTS POLICY
      We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
       
      You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
       
      Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
       
      No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
       
      We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
       

      Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

      Sponsored by
      ADVERTISEMENT

      facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

      Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
      Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
       
      Subscribe to IBJ
      1. Thank you to the scientists who care enough to find a cure. We are so lucky that their intelligence has brought them to these understandings because it is through these understandings that we have new hope. Certainly the medicine will be expensive, these drugs usually are, especially the ones that are not mass produced. If I know anything from the walks that my town has put on for FA it is this: people care and people want to help. Donations and financial support can and will come to those who need it. All we need is a cure, the money will come. I mean, look at what these scientists have done thanks to the generosity of donors. 30 million dollars brings us here where we can talk about a drug's existence! There is so much to be frustrated about in this world, but this scientific break is not one of them. I am so happy for this new found hope. Thank you so much to the scientists who have been slaving away to help my friends with FA. We wish you speedy success in the time to come!

      2. I love tiny neighborhood bars-- when I travel city to city for work, it's my preference to find them. However, too many still having smoking inside. So I'm limited to bars in the cities that have smoking bans. I travel to Kokomo often, and I can promise, I'll be one of those people who visit the ma and pa bars once they're smoke free!

      3. I believe the issue with keystone & 96th was due to running out of funds though there were other factors. I just hope that a similar situation does not befall ST RD 37 where only half of the overhaul gets built.

      4. It's so great to see a country founded on freedom uphold the freedom for all people to work and patronize a public venue without risking their health! People do not go to bars to smoke, they can take it outside.

      5. So, Hurko, mass transit has not proven itself in Indy so we should build incredibly expensive train lines? How would that fix the lack of demand? And as far as those double decker buses to bus people in from suburbs, we can't fill up a regular sized buses now and have had to cancel lines and greatly subsidize others. No need for double decker buses there.

      ADVERTISEMENT