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Some big bills on back burner in Indiana Legislature

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Three weeks into Indiana's legislative session, Republican House Speaker Brian Bosma is touting the hard work already being done on major issues. Not surprisingly, Democratic House Minority Leader Patrick Bauer contends the session is off to a slow start.

Actually, they're both right.

Some big issues — including a fix for the state's insolvent unemployment fund and a contentious plan to use taxpayer money to help parents send their children to private school — have yet to be discussed in committee meetings.

But lawmakers are working quickly to advance other bills. Lawmakers have fast-tracked a bill that would expand the use of centralized vote centers, an effort to help counties that want to use vote centers instead of traditional neighborhood precincts in the May municipal primaries. Legislative committees have also approved bills to ban texting while driving and outlaw smoking in public places other than casinos and horse racing tracks. Both bills have been proposed in years past but seem to have more momentum this year.

Bosma, R-Indianapolis, said committee chairmen have "conducted some very positive discussions on critical issues that are before our state and our General Assembly."

"They are doing precisely what we've asked — to have full and fair committee hearings," Bosma said.

But Bauer, D-South Bend, questioned why lawmakers aren't focusing more time on efforts to create jobs.

"We have gotten off to a very slow start," he said.

Some complex bills — such as a new, two-year state budget — always move through the legislative process at a snail's pace. The House Ways and Means Committee that begins the legislative budgeting process has begun holding hearings, listening to funding requests from state agencies and universities. Those meetings will stretch into early February, but final budget negotiations won't take place until the legislative session nears its end in late April. Lawmakers won't approve a budget until after they receive updated predictions of state revenue, which usually occurs in mid-April.

Redistricting is also on the back burner for now as lawmakers await 2010 Census data — expected to arrive in February at the earliest — that will help them redraw maps for the state's nine congressional and 150 state legislative districts. Those maps will stand for the next decade. Republicans will control the process because they have the majority in both the Indiana House and Senate.

While the big-ticket items wait, lawmakers are keeping busy hashing out the details of plenty of controversial bills. A Senate committee plans a Feb. 2 hearing on an immigration proposal that would require police to ask for proof of citizenship or immigration status if they have a reasonable suspicion that a person is in the country illegally. A proposal to fix the state's unemployment fund — which pays out millions more in jobless benefits than it takes in from employers — will get a hearing in a House committee Tuesday.

The House Education Committee is expected to vote Monday to approve a plan that aims to create more charter schools, a move pushed by GOP Gov. Mitch Daniels but opposed by some education leaders who say the proposal will siphon money away from traditional public schools. And the Senate Education Committee is slated to vote Wednesday on Daniels' proposal to give a $3,500 scholarship to high school students who graduate a year early.

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  • Immigration laws
    Let's just take all them off the books then Rick since you say their unenforceable. But you don't get it. Do you pay taxes? Then you already feed (food stamps) & house (public housing vouchers) them. Plus you pay for their healthcare when they show up in the emergency room and can't pay for all the expensive services they receive for free.

    Yeah Rick (& Sandy), let's just not change anything and keep paying for what we already are...smart thinking.

    Solve the illegal immigration problem by taking away their opportunities and make them conform to American culture, language, and values and they'll either strive to do it the right way, legally, or go away all by themselves.
  • I agree with Rick
    Did those wackos in the legislature notice that huge convention center remodeling project that was just completed a block south of the state capitol? The convention center is concerned that our lack of a tough non-smoking ban could affect their ability to fill the expanded convention center. So, by all means, letÃ?¢ââ??‰â??¢s do something thatÃ?¢ââ??‰â??¢ll be sure and kill other potential convention business with a upid, an unenforceable anti-immigration bill.

    By the way, how many of those hateful legislators are Native Americans?
  • immigration? really?
    Do we think we are Arizona or something? What a waste of time and resources. If somebody is here illegally, who's going to pay to feed, house and deport them? We are - what a waste.

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  1. The deductible is entirely paid by the POWER account. No one ever has to contribute more than $25/month into the POWER account and it is often less. The only cost not paid out of the POWER account is the ER copay ($8-25) for non-emergent use of the ER. And under HIP 2.0, if a member calls the toll-free, 24 hour nurse line, and the nurse tells them to go to the ER, the copay is waived. It's also waived if the member is admitted to the hospital. Honestly, although it is certainly not "free" - I think Indiana has created a decent plan for the currently uninsured. Also consider that if a member obtains preventive care, she can lower her monthly contribution for the next year. Non-profits may pay up to 75% of the contribution on behalf of the member, and the member's employer may pay up to 50% of the contribution.

  2. I wonder if the governor could multi-task and talk to CMS about helping Indiana get our state based exchange going so Hoosiers don't lose subsidy if the court decision holds. One option I've seen is for states to contract with healthcare.gov. Or maybe Indiana isn't really interested in healthcare insurance coverage for Hoosiers.

  3. So, how much did either of YOU contribute? HGH Thank you Mr. Ozdemir for your investments in this city and your contribution to the arts.

  4. So heres brilliant planning for you...build a $30 M sports complex with tax dollars, yet send all the hotel tax revenue to Carmel and Fishers. Westfield will unlikely never see a payback but the hotel "centers" of Carmel and Fishers will get rich. Lousy strategy Andy Cook!

  5. AlanB, this is how it works...A corporate welfare queen makes a tiny contribution to the arts and gets tons of positive media from outlets like the IBJ. In turn, they are more easily to get their 10s of millions of dollars of corporate welfare (ironically from the same people who are against welfare for humans).

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