IBJOpinion

DINING: Tomato fare at the fair

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share
Dining - A&E

Every year, the Indiana State Fair powers that be select a signature food and invite vendors to use that item as a key ingredient in a for-sale dish.

This year that item is the tomato, the bright red orb that is a standard item in low-maintenance gardens and Red Gold cans. If the five finalists didn’t come up with anything likely to be a fair staple, they at least provided us an excuse to get out on opening day for a sampling survey. (And, yes, we also tried the chocolate covered—and tomato free—bacon. The less said about that, the better).

All dishes will be available through the Fair’s closing day, Aug. 23.

Pizza Cone: We had high hopes for the concept: tomato and cheese (plus optional pepperoni) tucked into a nest of baked dough. But standard-issue sauce, partially melted cheese, and long wait time led to our lackluster response. ($4. Find it at King’s Concessions, located near the Home & Family Arts Building.)

Pizza Cone (IBJ Photos/Robin Jerstad)

YaYa’s Tomato Balls: This one, it’s claimed, comes from a family recipe from the old country (Greece, in particular). And the deep-fried combination of tomato, grated cheese, onions, spices and bread crumbs does taste like there’s history in it. Our favorite of the bunch. ($6. Papageorge’s Inc., located near the West Pavilion across from Hook’s.)

YaYa’s Tomato Balls

Fried Pizza: Judges picked this one as the winner, and we sort of understand that, given the competition. But this attractive item is really little more than an elephant ear ladled with a thin coating of sauce and sprinkled with cheese. Forgive us for expecting something more akin to the Panzarotti, the more appetizing steam-filled calzone variation that’s been around for generations. ($5, Urick Concessions, located near the Grand Hall.)

Fried Pizza

Tomato Bob: Seriously? A couple of cherry tomatoes and slices of cucumber and green pepper qualify as a State Fair finalist? This healthy-but-so-what entry is more of a children’s-area craft exercise than a worthy food competitor. ($3, Smith Concessions, located near the West Pavilion)

 

Tomato Bob

Sun-dried Tomato Pork Burger: Moister than one might expect, this slider puts most of the tomato flavor on top, where it moistened the bun more than flavoring the fried pork. A good enough snack, if not particularly memorable. ($3, Barto’s Catering, located near the Farm Bureau Building.)

Sun-dried Tomato Pork Burger
ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. In reality, Lilly is maintaining profit by cutting costs such as Indiana/US citizen IT workers by a significant amount with their Tata Indian consulting connection, increasing Indian H1B's at Lillys Indiana locations significantly and offshoring to India high paying Indiana jobs to cut costs and increase profit at the expense of U.S. workers.

  2. I think perhaps there is legal precedence here in that the laws were intended for family farms, not pig processing plants on a huge scale. There has to be a way to squash this judges judgment and overrule her dumb judgement. Perhaps she should be required to live in one of those neighbors houses for a month next to the farm to see how she likes it. She is there to protect the people, not the corporations.

  3. http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/engineer/facts/03-111.htm Corporate farms are not farms, they are indeed factories on a huge scale. The amount of waste and unhealthy smells are environmentally unsafe. If they want to do this, they should be forced to buy a boundary around their farm at a premium price to the homeowners and landowners that have to eat, sleep, and live in a cesspool of pig smells. Imagine living in a house that smells like a restroom all the time. Does the state really believe they should take the side of these corporate farms and not protect Indiana citizens. Perhaps justifiable they should force all the management of the farms to live on the farm itself and not live probably far away from there. Would be interesting to investigate the housing locations of those working at and managing the corporate farms.

  4. downtown in the same area as O'malia's. 350 E New York. Not sure that another one could survive. I agree a Target is needed d'town. Downtown Philly even had a 3 story Kmart for its downtown residents.

  5. Indy-area residents... most of you have no idea how AMAZING Aurelio's is. South of Chicago was a cool pizza place... but it pales in comparison to the heavenly thin crust Aurelio's pizza. Their deep dish is pretty good too. My waistline is expanding just thinking about this!

ADVERTISEMENT