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Twitter tool winner of Startup Weekend event

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StatsSquared, a Twitter analytics tool, came away victorious as the winner of Startup Weekend, an event that attracted about 60 entrepreneurs vying for the chance to compete in a global competition.

The Nov. 12-14 session at Purdue University’s technology center near Indianapolis International Airport was one of many such competitions held around the world.

Both Purdue and Indiana University have hosted Startup Weekend before. What was different about this year's session for local participants is that the weekend culminated on Sunday with a panel of judges selecting a winning company.

StatsSquared now will compete against other winners from cities worldwide in an online contest for the overall top prize.

Several other startups competed in Indianapolis:

— EatDrinkIt, a mobile application that rates restaurant dishes;

— Scygle, an academic cross-referencing database;

— WaitMait, an application to make taking orders in restaurants faster and easier for waiters, cooks and customers;

— Likedity, a social network to help users locate people with similar interests;

— NoteSee, a system for aggregating conference notes;

— GnomadDesk, a portable laptop desk that attaches to roller bags.  GnomadDesk was the only physical product competing.

More about the competing companies can be found here.

StatsSquared is expected to create a 60-second video summarizing its idea and submit it within 24 hours of the end of the Indianapolis competition. The video, along with those from winners in other cities, will be posted at www.startupweekend.org.

Startup Weekend coincides with Global Entrepreneurship Week on Nov. 15-21.
 

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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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