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Well-located Carmel retail center plagued by vacancies

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By all objective measures, Carmel’s Merchants’ Square should be a powerhouse shopping center.

Merchants Merchants’ Square was redeveloped in the mid-1990s. (IBJ Photo/ Perry Reichanadter)

It sits at a high-traffic corner in central Indiana’s most-sought-after suburb. More than 145,000 people live within a five-mile radius and their families have an average household income of more than $112,000—higher than the area surrounding The Fashion Mall at Keystone.

But the center—built in 1970 as the Target-anchored and enclosed Keystone Square Mall and redeveloped into an open-air center and renamed in the mid-1990s—is riddled with vacancies and bracing for another high-profile departure.

Merchants factboxOld Navy and Finish Line decamped years ago for Clay Terrace. Hobby Lobby, Starbucks and Chipotle headed for locations with better visibility. And now the furniture and home accessories superstore Arhaus plans to leave for a location in Rivers Edge along East 82nd Street.

The center has performed so poorly that its owner, Farmington Hills, Mich.-based Ramco-Gershenson Properties Trust, managed to persuade a lender late last year to sell the note on the property at less than half its face value.

The publicly traded company paid $16.8 million to retire a debt balance of $37.7 million, records show.

“When you look at the numbers, it’s stunning that thing doesn’t work,” Brian F. Knapp, a director in the local office of Colliers International, said of the Carmel retail property.

Merchants mapThe center’s less-than-ideal visibility from 116th Street, Keystone Avenue or Carmel Drive hasn’t helped. Neither have long-lasting road restrictions to add roundabouts in the area and turn Keystone Avenue into a limited-access highway, although traffic is improving now that the work is done.

Another factor is competition from new retail centers. Merchants’ Square has become less of a regional retail draw with the addition of Clay Terrace and Hamilton Town Center, said Paul Gold, vice president in the local office of Pittsburgh-based Echo Retail. The center also suffers from its proximity to the Keystone/Clearwater shopping area.

“The opportunity is as more of a community-oriented center,” Gold said.

Ramco-Gershenson officials say the deal with the lender gives them flexibility to attract tenants with more competitive rents and generous allowances for tenant improvements.

Already, the company is seeing progress. Tuesday Morning has filled the long-vacant Old Navy space. New small tenants including Chyten Tutors and Test Preparation, CPR Cell Phone Repair and Core Pilates have joined the center in recent months.

William Gershenson, the company’s director of shop leasing, said another national tenant has expressed interest in the 12,000-square-foot former home of athletic footwear and apparel retailer Finish Line, a replacement is looking at a former Starbucks location, and a new user is poised to replace a former Hardees restaurant near the corner of 116th Street and Keystone Avenue.

He declined to name any of the replacements.

“The climate has changed in retail,” Gershenson said. “We are seeing a huge uptick in tenant interest.”

He said the company would pursue redevelopment of the center if the right opportunity came along.

In the meantime, Ramco-Gershenson’s top target as new tenants are entertainment users such as a movie theater, bowling alley or arcade that would turn Merchants’ Square into “a grocery-anchored center on steroids,” Gershenson said.

Carmel officials over the years have researched the possibility of attracting other uses to the Merchants’ property, including classroom space for IUPUI or Ball State University.

But ultimately, the city wants to keep the center on property tax rolls so the owners can repay the roughly 40 percent still outstanding on $22 million in tax-increment-backed bonds that financed part of the property’s redevelopment in the 1990s, after Target decided to move its store to Westfield.

Merchants Gary Linder, now deceased, led the redevelopment of Merchants’ Square in the mid-1990s, after Target opted to move to Westfield. (IBJ file Photo)

The redevelopment was led by The Linder Co., predecessor to Sitehawk Retail Real Estate. Linder basically turned the existing center inside out and added three retail strips and outlots to the perimeter of the property. The center reopened in 1998.

Ramco-Gershenson owns 278,875 square feet of the center, and Marsh owns its own 80,000-square-foot grocery store. Ramco acquired the center from Linder Co. in 2004, paying $37.3 million and assuming $23 million in debt.

Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard said Merchants’ Square was 100-percent occupied for years after the Linder Co. renovation, remains viable today and could return to high levels of occupancy with some more attention from its management. He said the center today has a vacancy rate of about 25 percent.

“It’s been successful in the past, and there’s no reason it shouldn’t be successful in the future,” Brainard said.

Surrounding retail properties also have struggled. In the center immediately south of Merchants’ Square, Longhorn Steakhouse moved to a spot near Castleton Square Mall, and Borders closed its bookstore earlier this year.

There have also been signs of progress in the neighborhood: Zhu Lan Buffet, from the same family behind The Journey on 96th Street, has replaced a shuttered O’Charley’s restaurant, and The National Bank of Indianapolis has begun construction on a branch to replace a Burger King.•

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  • Roads
    The long term road construction virtually killed many businesses in that immediate area. Plus, you have to be quite familiar with that area to easily access the center. It can be quite confusing for strangers. Its gonna be a LONG time before it comes back. Kudos to Marsh for staying in that location.

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  1. With Pence running the ship good luck with a new government building on the site. He does everything on the cheap except unnecessary roads line a new beltway( like we need that). Things like state of the art office buildings and light rail will never be seen as an asset to these types. They don't get that these are the things that help a city prosper.

  2. Does the $100,000,000,000 include salaries for members of Congress?

  3. "But that doesn't change how the piece plays to most of the people who will see it." If it stands out so little during the day as you seem to suggest maybe most of the people who actually see it will be those present when it is dark enough to experience its full effects.

  4. That's the mentality of most retail marketers. In this case Leo was asked to build the brand. HHG then had a bad sales quarter and rather than stay the course, now want to go back to the schlock that Zimmerman provides (at a considerable cut in price.) And while HHG salesmen are, by far, the pushiest salesmen I have ever experienced, I believe they are NOT paid on commission. But that doesn't mean they aren't trained to be aggressive.

  5. The reason HHG's sales team hits you from the moment you walk through the door is the same reason car salesmen do the same thing: Commission. HHG's folks are paid by commission they and need to hit sales targets or get cut, while BB does not. The sales figures are aggressive, so turnover rate is high. Electronics are the largest commission earners along with non-needed warranties, service plans etc, known in the industry as 'cheese'. The wholesale base price is listed on the cryptic price tag in the string of numbers near the bar code. Know how to decipher it and you get things at cost, with little to no commission to the sales persons. Whether or not this is fair, is more of a moral question than a financial one.

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