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Colts favored to win Super Bowl by Vegas oddsmakers

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Peyton Manning and the Indianapolis Colts are favored by Las Vegas oddsmakers to win the Super Bowl after coming up short in their championship bid last season.

The Colts enter the regular season with 13-2 odds of capturing their second National Football League title in five years, according to Las Vegas Sports Consultants, which advises Nevada’s sports books on betting lines.

The 34-year-old Manning led the Colts to an NFL-best 14-2 record last season and beat out New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees to win his fourth Most Valuable Player award before losing to the Saints 31-17 in the Super Bowl. Super Bowl losers don't typically fare well the following season, but oddsmakers think the Colts can overcome history.

“We’ve made some improvements almost in every area a little bit, albeit somewhat incremental, but the true test comes up (this) week,” Colts coach Jim Caldwell said. “That’s when you can really start to gauge exactly who you are. But you can make an assessment, and I think in a lot of areas we got better.”

The 31-year-old Brees and his Saints are tied with the Dallas Cowboys as the second Super Bowl choice with odds of 8-1.

The Saints are seeking to become the first repeat Super Bowl champions since the New England Patriots after the 2003 and 2004 seasons. The Cowboys will aim to become the first franchise to win the title game in its home stadium.

Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, will be the site of this season’s Super Bowl on Feb. 6, 2011.

The San Diego Chargers have 17-2 odds of winning the title, followed by the Patriots at 9-1 and the Green Bay Packers and Minnesota Vikings at 10-1.

The Saints host the Vikings and quarterback Brett Favre in the NFL’s regular-season opener on Sept. 9. It’s a rematch of last season’s conference championship game, which the Saints won 31-28 in overtime to reach the Super Bowl.

The Colts, one of two teams to go winless in the preseason, open the regular season on Sept. 12 in Houston.

The New York Jets, who fell one win short of reaching the Super Bowl last season, have 12-1 odds in the second season for coach Rex Ryan and quarterback Mark Sanchez.

The Saints won the Super Bowl last season after entering the year with 20-1 odds of winning the title. The Colts a year ago were the sixth choice to win the championship at 12-1.

Here's a look at the odds of winning the Super Bowl for each team:

Indianapolis Colts    13-2
New Orleans Saints    8-1
Dallas Cowboys    8-1
San Diego Chargers    17-2
New England Patriots    9-1
Green Bay Packers    10-1
Minnesota Vikings    10-1
New York Jets        12-1
Baltimore Ravens    14-1
New York Giants    15-1
Pittsburg Steelers    20-1
Atlanta Falcons    22-1
Tennessee Titans    25-1
Cincinnati Bengals    25-1
Washington Redskins    28-1
Chicago Bears        30-1
Houston Texans    30-1
Miami Dolphins    30-1
Philadelphia Eagles    30-1
San Francisco 49ers    40-1
Arizona Cardinals    50-1
Carolina Panthers    50-1
Denver Broncos    50-1
Jacksonville Jaguars    50-1
Seattle Seahawks    50-1
Cleveland Browns    80-1
Detroit Lions        100-1
Kansas City Chiefs    100-1
Oakland Raiders    100-1
Tampa Bay Bucs    100-1
Buffalo Bills        120-1
St. Louis Rams    150-1


 

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  • this is the year
    that the HOUSTON TEXANS break thru. sorry colts we will be a wild card at 9-7 or not make the playoffs at all.
  • Nope!
    This is the year the quick decline of Peyton Manning begins. Not happening this year Colts fans...

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  1. PJ - Mall operators like Simon, and most developers/ land owners, establish individual legal entities for each property to avoid having a problem location sink the ship, or simply structure the note to exclude anything but the property acting as collateral. Usually both. The big banks that lend are big boys that know the risks and aren't mad at Simon for forking over the deed and walking away.

  2. Do any of the East side residence think that Macy, JC Penny's and the other national tenants would have letft the mall if they were making money?? I have read several post about how Simon neglected the property but it sounds like the Eastsiders stopped shopping at the mall even when it was full with all of the national retailers that you want to come back to the mall. I used to work at the Dick's at Washington Square and I know for a fact it's the worst performing Dick's in the Indianapolis market. You better start shopping there before it closes also.

  3. How can any company that has the cash and other assets be allowed to simply foreclose and not pay the debt? Simon, pay the debt and sell the property yourself. Don't just stiff the bank with the loan and require them to find a buyer.

  4. If you only knew....

  5. The proposal is structured in such a way that a private company (who has competitors in the marketplace) has struck a deal to get "financing" through utility ratepayers via IPL. Competitors to BlueIndy are at disadvantage now. The story isn't "how green can we be" but how creative "financing" through captive ratepayers benefits a company whose proposal should sink or float in the competitive marketplace without customer funding. If it was a great idea there would be financing available. IBJ needs to be doing a story on the utility ratemaking piece of this (which is pretty complicated) but instead it suggests that folks are whining about paying for being green.

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