IBJNews

Cummins gets $54M to improve fuel efficiency

Back to TopCommentsE-mailPrintBookmark and Share

Columbus engine maker Cummins Inc. will receive nearly $54 million in federal funding as part of a program designed to significantly increase fuel efficiency in heavy trucks and passenger vehicles.

The program is directing $187 million in federal funding to nine U.S. projects designed to significantly increase fuel efficiency in heavy trucks and passenger vehicles, with more than half coming from the $787 billion stimulus package and the remainder from DOE appropriations. Recipients are expected to match government funding, creating a total investment of $375 million in the projects.

Energy Secretary Stephen Chu detailed the projects Monday during a ceremony in Cummins' hometown.

Cummins will get about $38.8 million to develop a more efficient and cleaner diesel engine for heavy trucks, a more aerodynamic long-haul truck cab and trailer, and a fuel cell that would deliver auxiliary power to reduce engine idling while the vehicle was not on the road. The company will partner with Peterbilt Motors Co. on the so-called "SuperTruck" project.

Another $15 million will help Cummins develop a fuel-efficient, low-emissions diesel engine for light-duty passenger vehicles. The goal is to come up with an engine that is 40 percent more efficient than conventional gasoline technology.

"We appreciate the funding ... which will create jobs, help address climate change and reduce oil consumption," Cummins President Tom Linebarger said in a prepared statement. "This public-private partnership is a win for our economy, a win for the environment and a win for energy challenges."

More than 60 technical positions will be dedicated to the project work during the development phase, Cummins said, and more jobs will be created when the new engines are produced.

The DOE said the nine recipients are expected to create more than 500 research, engineering and management jobs, with 6,000 more positions anticipated when the technologies go into production and assembly.

In detailing the project awards, the administration said the new technologies, when in broad use, "could save more than 100 million gallons of oil per day and reduce carbon emissions from on-road vehicles by 20 percent by 2030."

Three of the projects, receiving $115 million, are aimed at improving long-haul truck fuel efficiency by 50 percent, with new designs to be ready by 2015.

In addition to Cummins, Navistar Inc.'s Fort Wayne operation is in line for $37.3 million and Daimler Trucks North America LLC, of Portland, Ore., will receive nearly $40 million.

The remaining six projects for passenger vehicles will spread more than $71 million among Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, Delphi Automotive Systems, Robert Bosch and a second Cummins project.

The money will go to companies based in economically hard-hit Michigan and Indiana, with the exception of Daimler Trucks.

Cummins reported profit of $95 million in its third quarter ended Sept. 27, down 59 percent from the same period a year earlier. The company expected sales to be down less than 30 percent for the entire year. Shares were trading at $54.54 in late morning, up 87 cents from Friday's close.

ADVERTISEMENT

Post a comment to this story

COMMENTS POLICY
We reserve the right to remove any post that we feel is obscene, profane, vulgar, racist, sexually explicit, abusive, or hateful.
 
You are legally responsible for what you post and your anonymity is not guaranteed.
 
Posts that insult, defame, threaten, harass or abuse other readers or people mentioned in IBJ editorial content are also subject to removal. Please respect the privacy of individuals and refrain from posting personal information.
 
No solicitations, spamming or advertisements are allowed. Readers may post links to other informational websites that are relevant to the topic at hand, but please do not link to objectionable material.
 
We may remove messages that are unrelated to the topic, encourage illegal activity, use all capital letters or are unreadable.
 

Messages that are flagged by readers as objectionable will be reviewed and may or may not be removed. Please do not flag a post simply because you disagree with it.

Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT

facebook - twitter on Facebook & Twitter

Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ on Facebook:
Follow on TwitterFollow IBJ's Tweets on these topics:
 
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

ADVERTISEMENT