Small Business

airdroids-8-2col.jpg

Drone startup off to flying startRestricted Content

July 19, 2014
Two friends and drone enthusiasts in 2012 hatched the idea, as a side gig, to build flying devices small enough to fit in a briefcase. But the idea shifted to a full-scale manufacturing operation that will launch in mid-August and is projected to produce up to $10 million in revenue next year.More.

Tech entrepreneur launches Indy Visitors Channel

July 26, 2014
Folksy chief cements deals with handshakes, promotes tourism spots with video network in hotels.More.

Homegrown Krazy Klothes defies overseas-made clothing trend

July 26, 2014
Owner Dan Murphy's more-than-two-decades-old, Indianapolis-based company is something of an anachronism—a small-scale domestic clothing manufacturer doing business in a field dominated by Asian-based titans.More.

Bar owner alleges racism in lease dispute

July 26, 2014
The owner of a nightclub in the heart of Broad Ripple believes his landlords nearly doubled his rent for just one reason: to force him and his mostly African-American clientele from the building.More.

Other Small Business Coverage

Veteran private investigator steps up cyber sleuthingRestricted Content

Overbearing spouses, disgruntled employees and corporate moles have a wide new path for spying, considering that nine in 10 adults own mobile phones. Aiding the hackers is protective software that’s thin at best.More.

Indiana office to promote startups, small business

Gov. Mike Pence has created the Indiana Office of Small Business and Entrepreneurship that he says will focus on consulting, specialty programming, and integrating universities, private businesses and government agencies.More.

WOJTOWICZ: Lots to consider when weighing mortgage payoff

You certainly don’t want to keep paying a mortgage if it restricts your business in other areas. But you don’t want to cough up too much at once and have the same effect.More.

Marketer SmallBox helping clients improve their culturesRestricted Content

In mid-2011, the staff of local Web marketing firm SmallBox began a period of self-reflection that allowed the team to identify its “North Star,” the purpose, mission and vision that keeps a company headed in the right direction. It's now spreading the word.More.

Market owner: "Look into the future"Restricted Content

Georgetown Market has stayed in the health food game since 1973, in part because of owner Rick Montieth's ability to see down the road.More.

More Small Business Coverage

 
Sponsored by
ADVERTISEMENT
Subscribe to IBJ
  1. In Europe there are schools for hairdressing but you don't get a license afterwards but you are required to assist in turkey and Italy its 7 years in japan it's 10 years England 2 so these people who assist know how to do hair their not just anybody and if your an owner and you hire someone with no experience then ur an idiot I've known stylist from different countries with no license but they are professional clean and safe they have no license but they have experience a license doesn't mean anything look at all the bad hairdressers in the world that have fried peoples hair okay but they have a license doesn't make them a professional at their job I think they should get rid of it because stateboard robs stylist and owners and they fine you for the dumbest f***ing things oh ur license isn't displayed 100$ oh ur wearing open toe shoes fine, oh there's ONE HAIR IN UR BRUSH that's a fine it's like really? So I think they need to go or ease up on their regulations because their too strict

  2. Its a THUG issue. Bleecker Street and NYX are thug bars. They attract thugs of all races. Places that attract thugs need to be kicked out of Broad Ripple. Ain't nobody got time for that!

  3. The element that goes to Bleeker Street doesn't represent the average black person. Further, the same is true for the element that is responsible for the violence in Broad Ripple. The average black person is like any other person - concerned about his/her safety, wants to have a fun time in a positive environment, and wants to be treated with respect and dignity. The element that IS causing the issues is representative of low class blacks. African-Americans who are low on the socio-economic ladder who have limited resources and education, and perhaps, less to lose. If you don't want to patronize these types of Americans (irrespective of race), you do so via dress code screening - ex. no white tees, no gym shoes, no hoodies, no hats/head coverings, and in making sure the advertising appeals to your target demographic.

ADVERTISEMENT