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Indiana Design Center lines up tenants

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The $25 million Indiana Design Center in Carmel has signed 11 interior design-related tenants and a restaurant to anchor the 82,000-square-foot project, which is billed as the cornerstone of the city's Arts & Design District.

The building at 200 S. Range Line Road was started in 2007 and construction is just wrapping up. It was developed by Carmel-based Pedcor Cos. and is owned by a Pedcor affiliate. The Carmel Redevelopment Commission owns a 109-space garage under the building.

Conceived as part of the revitalization of downtown Carmel, the design center is intended to house under one roof a collection of interior designers and showrooms for all manner of interior design products.

The largest of its tenants is The Trade Source, which is leasing a 15,000-square-foot showroom space to display more than 100 lines of decorative fabrics, drapery hardware and specialty wall coverings. The company, owned and operated by Susan Crockett, moved from Hancock Street in Carmel and opened its new showroom in February.

Other major tenants include the 2,800-square-foot Albert Square Limited/J. Baker Interiors, a furniture and accessories showroom and full-service interior design studio, and Julie O’Brien Design Group, a 2,500-square-foot interior design and architecture firm that is moving this month from 116th and Meridian streets.

The only non-design business signed for the Indiana Design Center is the Blu Moon Café, which will open this summer. The 2,000-square-foot restaurant will serve soups, salads, deli sandwiches and desserts and offer indoor and outdoor dining. The café is owned by Brian and Shelley Jordan, who also own the Logan Street Marketplace restaurant in Noblesville.

Outre, a family-owned custom furniture store, rounds out the first of five showroom spaces that have been leased in the building. Outre will move this month from a small space downtown at 245 McCrea St., near Georgia and Meridian streets.

The newly announced roster of tenants and a 4,200-square-foot Design Resource Library account for about 40 percent of the Design Center space, said Melissa Averitt, who is in charge of leasing the building for Pedcor.

Averitt said tenants in the process of negotiating leases for showroom space could fill another 35 percent of the building by this summer. The building also offers studio spaces of between 300 and 600 square feet. Tenants pay between $21 and $25 a square foot for first-floor space. Second-floor rent is $20 a square foot.

Julie O’Brien, who started her design studio downtown before moving north five years ago, said the idea of other designers and interior design products housed in one building was a selling point.

“It will be so much easier to walk our clients through the design process,” said O’Brien, whose firm does commercial and residential interior design work. “It’s also a beautiful building with great energy,” O’Brien said. Among her firm’s projects was the restaurant Zing on Indiana Avenue downtown.

Averitt said her company is trying to position the Indiana Design Center as a resource for all of central Indiana. The center, which will have its grand opening this summer, is open to the public.
 

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  1. It is nice and all that the developer grew up here and lives here, but do you think a company that builds and rehabs cottage-style homes has the chops to develop $150 Million of office, retail, and residential? I'm guessing they will quickly be over their skis and begging the city for even more help... This project should occur organically and be developed by those that can handle the size and scope of something like this as several other posters have mentioned.

  2. It amazes me how people with apparently zero knowledge of free markets or capitalism feel the need to read and post on a business journal website. Perhaps the Daily Worker would suit your interests better. It's definitely more sympathetic to your pro government theft views. It's too bad the Star is so awful as I'm sure you would find a much better home there.

  3. In other cities, expensive new construction projects are announced by real estate developers. In Carmel, they are announced by the local mayor. I am so, so glad I don't live in Carmel's taxbase--did you see that Carmel, a small Midwest suburb, has $500 million in debt?? That's unreal! The mayor thinks he's playing with Lego sets and Monopoly money here! Let these projects develop organically without government/taxpayer backing! Also, from a design standpoint, the whole town of Carmel looks comical. Grand, French-style buildings and promenades, sitting next to tire yards. Who do you guys think you are? Just my POV as a recent transplant to Indy.

  4. GeorgeP, you mention "necessities". Where in the announcement did it say anything about basic essentials like groceries? None of the plans and "vision" have basic essentials listed and nothing has been built. Traffic WILL be a nightmare. There is no east/west road capacity. GeorgeP, you also post on www.carmelchatter.com and your posts have repeatedly been proven wrong. You seem to have a fair amount of inside knowledge. Do you work on the third floor of Carmel City Hal?

  5. I don't know about the commuter buses...but it's a huge joke to see these IndyGo buses with just one or two passengers. Absolutely a disgusting waste of TAXPAYER money. Get some cojones and stop funding them. These (all of them) council members work for you. FIRE THEM!

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