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Lender's suit says homebuilder owes $12.8M on loans

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A prominent local homebuilder and commercial developer owes $12.8 million on two loans he took out to buy property on Indianapolis’ south side that now are in default, according to a lawsuit filed by the company’s lender.

J. Greg Allen is the target of the complaint from M&I Bank, which alleges the Greenwood-based businessman failed to pay the loans he received in May 2008.

Allen borrowed the money to purchase two tracts of vacant land—59.7 acres and 13.3 acres—on the northeast corner of Emerson Avenue and County Line Road, the suit said.

As of June 24, Allen owed the entire $9 million balance on one loan and $3.8 million in principal on another $5.5 million loan, according to the suit. In addition, M&I claimed the builder owes $323,876 in interest on the two loans.

Milwaukee-based M&I is asking a Marion Superior Court judge to foreclose on the properties and issue a court order to sell the real estate to pay the judgment.

“Despite demand by M&I, the guarantor has failed and refused to honor his obligation to M&I pursuant to the terms and conditions of his guaranty and the other loan documents,” M&I charged in its suit.

But J. Greg Allen, who also operates a commercial division that developed downtown’s Allen Plaza, said he’s already come to an agreement with M&I to work out the debt and that he expects the suit to be withdrawn soon.

“I’ve been with that bank [formerly First Indiana Bank in Indianapolis] for 25 years,” Allen said, “and we’re in good standing with them.”

A spokeswoman for the bank declined to comment on the lawsuit.

J. Greg Allen Builder and Princeton Homes, both owned by Allen, folded recently after he filed suit against two longtime executives. Allen alleges in a suit filed in Johnson Superior Court that the two stole nearly $1 million “over a long period of time” from the companies. One of the executives has denied wrongdoing; an attorney for the other did not return a call from IBJ.

J. Greg Allen Builder, founded in 1986, ranked ninth among Indianapolis-area custom home builders in IBJ’s most recent Book of Lists with $5.7 million in revenue in 2009. It closed on 12 homes that year with an average sale price of $525,000.

Princeton Homes was the area’s 10th-largest home builder in 2009 with 30 permits filed.

 

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  • Executives No More
    The executives know that they got away with whatever they did..... There is no justice in today's court system. It is easy money for lawyers and mediators that will ultimately tell him to "settle". We need to clean up our court system.
  • Karma always come around
    The best of people are suffering during these difficult times. Some tell the truth of it. While others like this situation choose to continue to deceit and blame others for their failures Be honest and take responsibilty for once
  • Wanksta
    How can he say he's in "good standing" with the bank? Erroneous! It's no wonder banks don't do deals on a handshake anymore...this guy says he banked with them for 25 years and this is how he holds up his end of the contract after that relationship?
  • Here we go again
    Another "big spender" goes down in Indy...shocking. Why do all of these guys who brag the loudest about their money always end up in the news for being millions in debt...with no way to pay...then blame someone else. Time to step up and pay these people back and quit making excuses.
  • Hmmmphf....
    Anyone suprised by this????

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  1. John, unfortunately CTRWD wants to put the tank(s) right next to a nature preserve and at the southern entrance to Carmel off of Keystone. Not exactly the kind of message you want to send to residents and visitors (come see our tanks as you enter our city and we build stuff in nature preserves...

  2. 85 feet for an ambitious project? I could shoot ej*culate farther than that.

  3. I tried, can't take it anymore. Untill Katz is replaced I can't listen anymore.

  4. Perhaps, but they've had a very active program to reduce rainwater/sump pump inflows for a number of years. But you are correct that controlling these peak flows will require spending more money - surge tanks, lines or removing storm water inflow at the source.

  5. All sewage goes to the Carmel treatment plant on the White River at 96th St. Rainfall should not affect sewage flows, but somehow it does - and the increased rate is more than the plant can handle a few times each year. One big source is typically homeowners who have their sump pumps connect into the sanitary sewer line rather than to the storm sewer line or yard. So we (Carmel and Clay Twp) need someway to hold the excess flow for a few days until the plant can process this material. Carmel wants the surge tank located at the treatment plant but than means an expensive underground line has to be installed through residential areas while CTRWD wants the surge tank located further 'upstream' from the treatment plant which costs less. Either solution works from an environmental control perspective. The less expensive solution means some people would likely have an unsightly tank near them. Carmel wants the more expensive solution - surprise!

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