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Local attorney facing fraud charges resigns from bar

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A high-profile Indianapolis attorney accused of misappropriating $2.5 million in client funds has relinquished his law license to the Indiana bar.

William F. Conour, 65, turned himself in to federal authorities in late April.

According to the criminal complaint filed that month, Conour is accused of engaging in a scheme from December 2000 to March 2012 to defraud his clients, using money obtained from new settlement funds to pay for old settlements and debts. Prosecutors charge he kept clients’ settlement proceeds for his own use.

The federal court in Indianapolis where he is charged received notice of his resignation Tuesday. The Indiana Supreme Court’s Disciplinary Commission, which investigates and prosecutes misconduct claims against lawyers, filed a complaint for disciplinary action against Conour on May 24. The Supreme Court accepted Conour’s resignation on June 28.

Under Indiana law, Conour will have to wait five years if he wishes to petition for reinstatement to the bar.

Conour was admitted to the bar in 1974 and had no previous disciplinary history.

For years, he has been among the highest-profile attorneys in Indiana, representing individuals seriously injured or killed in construction accidents.
 

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  • His parents
    His parents would be rolling in their graves if they knew about this. They were very down to earth hard working people and Mr. Conour was not raised to behave like this. They would be sick.

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  1. The free market will seek its own level. If Employers cannot hire a retain good employees in Marion Co they will leave and set up shop in adjacent county. Marion Co already suffers from businesses leaving I would think this would encourage more of the same.

  2. We gotta stop this Senior crime. Perhaps long jail terms for these old boozers is in order. There are times these days (more rather than less) when this state makes me sick.

  3. One option is to redistribute the payroll tax already collected by the State. A greater share could be allocated to the county of the workplace location as opposed to the county of residency. Not a new tax, just re-allocate what is currently collected.

  4. Have to agree with Mal Burgess. The biggest problem is massive family breakdown in these neighborhoods. While there are a lot of similiarities, there is a MASSIVE difference between 46218 and 46219. 46219 is diluted by some stable areas, and that's probably where the officers live. Incentivizing is fine, but don't criticize officers for choosing not to live in these neighbor hoods. They have to have a break from what is arguably one of the highest stress job in the land. And you'll have to give me hard evidence that putting officers there is going to make a significant difference. Solid family units, responsible fathers, siblings with the same fathers, engaged parents, commitment to education, respect for the rule of law and the importance of work/a job. If the families and the schools (and society) will support these, THEN we can make a difference.

  5. @Agreed, when you dine in Marion County, the taxes paid on that meal go to state coffers (in the form of the normal sales taxes) and to the sports/entertainment venues operated by the CIB. The sales taxes on your clothing and supplies just go to the state. The ONLY way those purchases help out Indianapolis is through the payroll taxes paid by the (generally low-wage) hourly workers serving you.

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